All jokes aside size matters. Size matters because at least intellectually we all recognize that there is a relationship between the size of product and the effort required to build. We might argue over degree of the relationship or whether there are other attributes required to define the relationship, but the point is that size and effort are related. Size is important for estimating project effort, cost and duration. Size also provides us with a platform for topics as varied as scope management (defining scope creep and churn) to benchmarking. In a nutshell, size matters both as an input into the planning and controlling development processes and as a denomination to enable comparison between projects.

Finding the specific measure of software size for your organization is part art and part science. The selection of your size measure must deliver the data need to meet the measurement goal and to fit within the corporate culture (culture includes both people and the methodologies the organization uses). A framework for evaluation would include the following categories:

· Supports measurement goal

· Industry recognized

· Published methodology

· Useable when needed

· Accurate

· Easy enough

The next installment of this essay will discuss evaluating whether the size metrics supports the measurement goals and the topic of industry recognition.

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