Lots and lots of onions!

Lots and lots of onions!

Motivational Sunday!

Process improvement programs require the organization to engage and individual change-agents.  Engagement is an important factor for getting a process improvement program off the ground and then sustaining it. Generating engagement is not easy. Many of the Software Process and Measurement blog readers will have heard the adage that individuals (and ogres) are like an onion.  Like an onion, individuals have many layers of complexity. You get closer to the core the more you peel away.  Fundamentally, our core beliefs are inherent to workplace engagement. The organization then comprised of boxes and boxes of onions, as the organization reflects many individuals who are all complex in different ways.  Complexity makes it difficult to find a single mechanism to ensure engagement in the workplace.

It would be easy to say that working to create engagement is just too hard.  The complexity of the workplace, and even our individual complexity, should not be used as an excuse. We each bear a significant responsibility for being emotionally engaged.  In an interview for the Software Process and Measurement Cast, Kevin Kruse, New York Times bestselling author of Employee Engagement for Everyone: 4 Keys to Happiness and Fulfillment at Work stated that his research indicated that 43% of engagement was intrinsic. Said differently, nearly half of our own workplace engagement rests squarely on our own shoulders.  Whether the ratio is 40-60, 60-40 or 50-50 is less material than the realization that we can’t let complexity cause us to avoid engagement.

A simple definition of workplace engagement is involvement, commitment and interest in what you do.  If we can accept the complexity around us, then our part of engagement is easier.  The easier we make it to be engaged the easier it will be for others to engage with us. Being engaged will make it easier for others to follow as you mold and shape the organization around you!