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In Christianity, the seven deadly sins are the root of all other sins. This concept has been used as an analogy for the ills or risks for many professions.  The analogy fits as well for software metrics; focusing attention on the behaviors that could sap your program’s integrity, effectiveness and lifespan. Here we will look at the deadly sins from the point of view of a person or group that is creating or managing a metrics program. As with many things in life, forewarned is forearmed, and knowledge is a step towards avoidance.

Here are the seven deadly sins of metrics programs:

  • Pride – Believing that a single number/metric is more important than any other factor.
  • Envy – Instituting measures that facilitate the insatiable desire for another team’s people, tools or applications.
  • Wrath – Using measures to create friction between groups or teams.
  • Sloth – Unwillingness to act on or care about the measures you create.
  • Greed – Allowing metrics to be used as a tool to game the system for gain.
  • Gluttony – Application of an excess of metrics.
  • Lust – Pursuit of the number rather than the business goal.

All of the deadly sins have an impact on the value a metrics program can deliver.  Whether anyone sin is more detrimental than another is often a reflection of where a metrics program is in it’s life cycle. For instance, pride, the belief that one number is more important than all other factors, is more detrimental than sloth or a lack of motivation as a program begins whereas sloth becomes more of an issue as a program matures.  These are two very different issues with two very different impacts, however neither should be sneezed at if you value the long-term health of a metrics program. Pride can lead to overestimating your capabilities and sloth can lead to not using those you have in the end self-knowledge is the greatest antidote.

Over the next few days we will visit the seven deadly sins of metrics!

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