Best practices aren't magic and neither are goblins.

Best practices aren’t magic and neither are goblins.

To paraphrase Edwin Starr, “Best Practices, huh, what are they good for? Absolutely nothing,  Say it again . . .”

Every organization wants to use best practices. How many organizations do you know that would stand up and say we want to use average practices? Therefore a process with the moniker “best practice” on it has an allure that is hard to resist.  The problem is that one organization’s best practice is another’s average process, even if they produce the same quality and quantity of output.  Or even worse, one organization’s best practice might be beyond another organization.  The process reflects the overall organizational context.  It is possible that adopting a new process wholesale could produce output faster or better, but without tailoring, the chances are more random than many consultants would suggest. For example, just buying a configuration management tool without changing how you do configuration management will be less effective melding the tool with your processes.  Tailoring will allow you to use the process based on the attributes of the current organizational context such as the organization’s overall size or the capabilities of the people involved.

An example of an organization’s best practice that might not translate to all of its competitors is the use of super sophisticated inventory control computer systems used at Walmart. Would Walmart’s computer system help a local grocery store (let’s call this Hometown Grocery)? Not likely, the overhead of the same system would be beyond Hometown’s IT capabilities and budget.  However if hundreds of Hometown Groceries banded together, the answer might be different (tailoring the process to the environmental context).  Without tailoring the context, the best practice for Walmart would not be a best practice for our small town grocery.

The term best practice gets thrown around as if there was a dusty old tome full of magical incantations that will solve any crisis regardless of context (assuming you are a seventh level mage).  There are those that hold up the CMMI, ISO or SCRUM and shout (usually on email lists) that they are only way.  Let’s begin by putting the idea that there is a one-size-fits-all solution to every job to rest.  There isn’t and there never was any such animal.  Any individual process, practice or step that worked wonderfully in the company down the street will not work the same way for you, especially if you try to it do it same way they did.  Software development and maintenance isn’t a chemical reaction, a Lego construct or even magic.  Best practices, what are they good for?  Fortunately a lot, if used correctly.

Best practices find their highest value as a tool for you to use as a comparison in order for you to expose the assumptions hat have been used to build or evolve your own processes.   Knowledge allows you to challenge how and why are you are doing any specific step and provides an opportunity for change.  How many companies have embraced the tenants of the Toyota Production Systems after benchmarking Toyota?

Adopting best practices without regard to your context may not yield the benefits found on the box.  If you read the small print you’d see a warning. Use best practices only after reading all of the instructions and understanding of your goals and your environment.  This is not to say that exemplary practices should not be aggressively studied and translated into your organization.  Ignoring new ideas because they did not grow out of your context is just as crazy as embracing best practices without understanding the context it was created in. Best practices as an ideal, as a comparison so that you can understand your organization makes sense, not as plug-compatible modules.

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