Trying to read the context...

Trying to read the context…

Many people poke fun at consultants because they invariably use the phrase “it depends,” even when discussing lunch. “It depends” is code for the context of the situation matters to the answer. When I asked a sample of my readers and listeners to weigh in on whether being on-budget, on-scope or on-schedule was the most important attribute of project success, most answered without using the dreaded “it depends”. An excerpt for a recent Twitter conversation in response to the essay about being on-budget, emphasized that in real life the definition of success will be influenced context.

UntitledIn the sample I surveyed, being on-schedule was the most important attribute with on-scope a close second and on-budget a distant third. If I had added constraints to the mix the answer would probably have been different. One respondent, while explaining why they felt that scope was the key attribute of success, made a strong argument for context (without calling it out directly), “Budgets and schedules can be modified when justified, and functionality can be phased in over time.” The statement could easily be interpreted as as a statement that success criteria, at least in the short run, depends on the goals of the business and the context of the project.

We can all conceive of scenarios where a specific context lead one attribute to be viewed as the most important in project success ASSUMING the software does what it is supposed to do and in an adequate manner. As an example of context, one respondent noted that in his environment and for some projects, “regulatory requirements that say it MUST deploy on a specific date.” Failure to meet the date can result in fines or penalties. In a similar vein, another respondent stated, “Projects are often tied to an organization’s business milestones or regulatory requirements so missing the date is not acceptable.” In both cases the context of a project could lead a project team to focus on one attribute over another.

Why did I ask the question without context? As I have noted in earlier essays, we are all subject to cognitive biases. These bias act as filters and shortcuts that help us interpret data. The context of a project will provide information about the goals and constraints of the project. Our cognitive biases are usefully in helping us interpret project context. Which is why project teams with diverse perspectives tend to make better choices when sorting out which attribute is most important. Is one attribute truly more important than another? It depends!

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