Hydrogen is elementary!

Hydrogen is elementary!

Hand drawn chart Saturday.

In Scrum there are four-ish basic meetings. They are sprint planning, daily stand-up, demonstrations, retrospectives and backlog grooming (the “ish” part). Whether distributed or co-located, these meetings are critical to planning, communication and controlling how Agile is typically practiced. Getting them right is not optional, especially when the Agile team is distributed. While there specific techniques for each type of meeting (some people call them rituals) there a few basics that can be used as a checklist. They are:

  • Schedule and invite participants. Team members are easy! Schedule all standard meetings for team members upfront for as many sprints as you are panning to have. As a team, decide on who will participate in the demo and make sure they are invited as early as possible.
  • Review the goals and rules of the meeting upfront. Don’t assume that everyone knows the goal of the meeting and the ground rules for their participation.
  • Publish an agenda. Agendas provide focus for any meeting. While an agenda for a daily stand-up might sound like overkill (and for long-term, stable teams it probably is), I either review the outline of the meeting or send the outline to all participants before the meeting starts.
  • Check the tools and connections. Distributed teams will require tools and software packages; including audio conferencing, video conferencing, screen sharing and chat software. Ensure they are on, connected and that everyone has access BEFORE the meeting starts.
  • Ensure active facilitation is available. All meetings are facilitated. Actively facilitated meetings are typically more focused, while un-facilitated meetings tend to be less focused and more ad-hoc. Active or passive facilitation is your choice. Distributed teams should almost choose facilitation. If using Scrum, part of role of the Scrum master is to act as a facilitator. The Scrum master guides the team and participants to ensure all of the meetings are effective and meet their goals.
  • Hold a meeting retrospective. Spend a few moments after each meeting to validate the goals were met and what could be done better in the future.

Agile is not magic. All Agile teams use techniques that assume the team has a common goal to guide them and then use feedback generated through communication to stay on track. Distributed Agile teams need to pay more careful attention to the basics. The Scrum master should strive to make the tools and process needed for all of the meetings fade into the background; for the majority of the team the end must be more important than the process.

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