Overall project size influences variability.

Overall project size influences variability.

Risk is reflection of possibilities, stuff that could happen if the stars align. Therefore projects are highly influenced by variability. There are many factors that influence variability including complexity, process discipline, people and the size of the work. The impact of the size can be felt in two separate but equally important manners. The first is the size of the overall project and second is the size any particular unit of work.

Overall project size influences variability by increasing the sheer number of moving parts that have to relate to each other. As an example, the assembly of an automobile is a large endeavor and is the culmination of a number of relatively large subprojects. Any significant variance in how the subprojects are assembled along the path of building the automobile will cause problems in the final deliverable. Large software projects require extra coordination, testing, integration to ensure that all of the pieces fit together, deliver the functionality customers and stakeholders expect and act properly. All of these extra steps increase the possibility of variance.

Similarly large pieces of work, user stories in Agile, cause similar problems as noted for large projects, but at the team level. For example, when any piece of work enters a sprint the first step in the process of transforming that story into value is planning. Large pieces of work are more difficult to plan, if for no other reason that they take longer to break down into tasks increasing the likelihood that something will not be considered generating a “gotcha” later in the sprint.

Whether at a project or sprint level, smaller is generally simpler, and simpler generates less variability. There are a number of techniques for managing size.

  1. Short, complete sprints or iterations. The impact of time boxing on reducing project size has been discussed and understood in mainstream since the 1990’s (see Hammer and Champy, Reengineering the Corporation). Breaking a project into smaller parts reduces the overhead of coordination and provides faster feedback and more synchronization points, which reduces the variability. Duration of a sprint acts as constraint to the amount of work that can be taken and into a sprint and reasonably be completed.
  2. Team sizes of 5 to 9 are large enough to tackle real work while maintaining the stabile team relationships needed to coordinate the development and integration of functionality that can potentially be shipped at the end of each sprint. Team size constrains the amount of work that can enter a sprint and be completed.
  3. Splitting user stories is a mechanism to reduce the size of a specific piece of work so that it can be complete faster with fewer potential complications that cause variability. The process of splitting user stories breaks stories down into smaller independent pieces (INVEST) that be developed and tested faster. Smaller stories are less likely to block the entire team if anything goes wrong. This reduces variability and generates feedback more quickly, thereby reducing the potential for large batches of rework if the solution does not meet stakeholder needs. Small stories increases flow through the development processes reducing variability.

I learned many years ago that supersizing fries at the local fast food establishment was a bad idea in that it increased the variability in my caloric intake (and waistline). Similarly, large projects are subject to increased variability. There are just too many moving parts, which leads to variability and risk. Large user stories have exactly the same issues as large project just on a smaller scale. Agile techniques of short sprints and small team size provide constraints so that teams can control the size of work they are considering at any point in time. Teams need to take the additional step of breaking down stories into smaller pieces to continue to minimize the potential impact of variability.

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