Presentations are just one learning strategy.

Presentations are just one learning strategy.

How many times have you sat in a room, crowded around tables, perhaps taking notes on your laptop or maybe doing email while someone drones away about the newest process change? All significant organizational transformations require the learning and adoption of new techniques, concepts and methods. Agile transformations are no different. For example, a transformation from waterfall to Scrum will require developing an understanding of Agile concepts and Scrum techniques. Four types of high-level training strategies are often used to support process improvement, such as Agile transformations. They are:

  1. Classic Lecture /Presentation – A presenter stands in front of the class and presents information to the learners. In most organizations the classic classroom format is used in conjunction with a PowerPoint deck, which provides counterpoint and support for the presenter. The learner’s role is to take notes from the lecture, interactions between the class and presenter and the presentation material and then to synthesize what they have heard. Nearly everyone in an IT department is familiar with type of training from attending college or university. An example in my past was Psychology 101 at the University of Iowa with 500+ of my closest friends. I remember the class because it was at 8 AM and because of the people sleeping in the back row. While I do not remember anything about the material many years later, this technique is often very useful in broadly introducing concepts. This method is often hybridized with other strategies to more deeply implement techniques and methods.
  2. Active Learning – Is strategy that is based on the belief that learners should take responsibility for their own learning. Learners are provided with a set of activities that keep them busy doing what is to be learned while analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating. Learners must do more than just listen and take notes. The teacher acts as a facilitator to help ensure the learning activities include techniques such as Agile games, working in pairs/groups, role-playing with discussion of the material and other co-operative learning techniques. Active learning and lecture techniques are often combined.
  3. Experiential Learning – Experiential learning is learning from experience. The learner will perform tasks, reflect on performance and possibly suffer the positive or negative consequences of making mistakes or being successful. The theory behind experiential learning is that for learning to be internalized the experience needs to be concretely and actively engaged rather than in a more theoretical or purely in a reflective manner. Process improvement based on real time experimentation in the Toyota Production system is a type of experiential learning.
  4. Mentoring – Mentoring is a process that uses one-on-one coaching and leadership to help a learner do concrete tasks with some form of support. Mentoring is a form of experience based learning, most attributable to the experiential learning camp. Because mentoring is generally a one-on-one technique it is generally not scalable to for large-scale change programs.

The majority of change agents have not been educated in adult learning techniques and leverage classic presentation/lecture techniques spiced with exercises. However, each of these high-level strategies have value and can be leveraged to help build the capacity and capabilities for change.

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