Listen to the Software Process and Measurement Cast 323

SPaMCAST 323 features our essay, “Five Factors Leading to Failing With Agile.” Not all Agile implementations succeed.  There are five categories of behaviors that lead Agile implementations toward failure. Failure due to these behaviors is avoidable if an organization recognizes them before the damage is done AND has the will to solve them. Forewarned is forearmed!

We also have a new Form Follows Function column from Gene Hughson. This column begins a three column arc on micro-services and architecture.  We begin with a “Microservice Principles and Enterprise IT Architecture.”  Check out Gene’s blog at Form Follows Function.

We also have a new Explaining Communication column from Jo Ann Sweeney.  In this installment of Jo Ann’s column she discusses determining relevant and helpful objectives for communication activities as a precursor to getting value from project communication.

Call to action!

We are in the middle of a re-read of John Kotter’s classic Leading Change on the Software Process and Measurement Blog.  Are you participating in the re-read? Please feel free to jump in and add your thoughts and comments!

After we finish the current re-read will need to decide which book will be next.  We are building a list of the books that have had the most influence on readers of the blog and listeners to the podcast.  Can you answer the question?

What are the two books that have most influenced you career (business, technical or philosophical)?  Send the titles to spamcastinfo@gmail.com.

First, we will compile a list and publish it on the blog.  Second, we will use the list to drive future  “Re-read” Saturdays. Re-read Saturday is an exciting new feature that began on the Software Process and Measurement blog on November 8th.  Feel free to choose you platform; send an email, leave a message on the blog, Facebook or just tweet the list (use hashtag #SPaMCAST)!

Next

The next Software Process and Measurement Cast will feature our interview with Charley Tichenor and Talmon Ben-Cnaan on the Software Non-functional Assessment Process (SNAP).  SNAP is a standard process for measuring non-functional size.  As any developer knows, non-functional size can eclipse the functional requirements and therefore a tool that shines a light on that part of software development is useful for analyzing, planning and estimating work.

Shameless Ad for my book!

Mastering Software Project Management: Best Practices, Tools and Techniques co-authored by Murali Chematuri and myself and published by J. Ross Publishing. We have received unsolicited reviews like the following: “This book will prove that software projects should not be a tedious process, neither for you or your team.” Support SPaMCAST by buying the book here.

Available in English and Chinese

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