IMG_1249

The next book in our Re-Read Saturday feature will be Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox’s The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement. Originally published in 1984, it has been hugely influential because it introduced the Theory of Constraints, which is central to lean thinking. The book is written as a business novel. On February 21st we will begin re-read.

Note: If you don’t have a copy of the book, buy one.  If you use the link below it will support the Software Process and Measurement blog and podcast. Dead Tree Version or Kindle Version 

For the record, the top five books in the overall voting were:

  1. The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement – Eliyahu M. Goldrattand Jeff Cox 71%
  2. Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Done RightAtul Gawande 43%
  3. Three Tied:
    The Principles of Product Development Flow – Donald G. Reinertsen57%
    The Art of Software Testing – Glenford J. Myers, Cory Sandler and Tom Badgett8.57%
    The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses – Eric Reis 8.57%

I was asked on LinkedIn for a list of the other books that we have featured in the Re-Read Saturday series. Here they are:

7 Habits of Highly Effective People – Stephen Covey

Dr. Covey lays out seven behaviors of successful people (hence the title).  The book is based on observation, interviews and research; therefore the habits presented in the book not only make common sense, but also have a solid evidentiary basis. One of the reasons the book works is the integration of character and ethics into the principles.  I have written and podcasted on the importance and value of character and ethics in the IT environment many times.

Note: If you don’t have a copy of the book, buy one (I would loan you mine, but I suspect I will read it again).  If you use the link below it will support the Software Process and Measurement blog and podcast. Dead Tree Version Kindle Version

The re-read blog entries:

The audio podcast can be listened to HERE

Leading Change – John P. Kotter

Leading Change by John P. Kotter, originally published in 1996, has become a classic reference that most process improvement specialists either have or should have on their bookshelf. The core of the book lays out an eight-step model for effective change that anyone involved in change will find useful. However there is more to the book than just the model.

Note: If you don’t have a copy of the book, buy one.  If you use the link below it will support the Software Process and Measurement blog and podcast. Dead Tree Version 

Entries in the Re-Read are:

I have not compiled the entries into a single essay and podcast as of February 2015.

Advertisements