The demonstration needs to work for everyone, no matter where in the world you are.

The demonstration needs to work for everyone, no matter where in the world you are.

Demonstrations are an important tool for teams to gather feedback to shape the value they deliver.  Demonstrations provide a platform for the team to show the stories that have been completed so the stakeholders can interact with the solution.  The feedback a team receives not only ensures that the solution delivered meets the needs but also generates new insights and lets the team know they are on track.  Demonstrations should provide value to everyone involved. Given the breadth of participation in a demo, the chance of a distributed meeting is even more likely.  Techniques that support distributed demonstrations include:

  1. More written documentation: Teams, especially long-established teams, often develop shorthand expressions that convey meaning fall short before a broader audience. Written communication can be more effective at conveying meaning where body language can’t be read and eye contact can’t be made. Publish an agenda to guide the meeting; this will help everyone stay on track or get back on track when the phone line drops. Capture comments and ideas on paper where everyone can see them.  If using flip charts, use webcams to share the written notes.  Some collaboration tools provide a notepad feature that stays resident on the screen that can be used to capture notes that can be referenced by all sites.
  2. Prepare and practice the demo. The risk that something will go wrong with the logistics of the meeting increase exponentially with the number of sites involved.  Have a plan for the demo and then practice the plan to reduce the risk that you have not forgotten something.  Practice will not eliminate all risk of an unforeseen problem, but it will help.
  3. Replicate the demo in multiple locations. In scenarios with multiple locations with large or important stakeholder populations, consider running separate demonstrations.  Separate demonstrations will lose some of the interaction between sites and add some overhead but will reduce the logistical complications.
  4. Record the demo. Some sites may not be able to participate in the demo live due to their time zones or other limitations. Recording the demo lets stakeholders that could not participate in the live demo hear and see what happened and provide feedback, albeit asynchronously.  Recording the demo will also give the team the ability to use the recording as documentation and reference material, which I strongly recommend.
  5. Check the network(s)! Bandwidth is generally not your friend. Make sure the network at each location can support the tools you are going to use (video, audio or other collaboration tools) and then have a fallback plan. Fallback plans should be as low tech as practical.  One team I observed actually had to fall back to scribes in two locations who kept notes on flip charts by mirroring each-other (cell phones, bluetooth headphones and whispering were employed) when the audio service they were using went down.

Demonstrations typically involve stakeholders, management and others.  The team needs feedback, but also needs to ensure a successful demo to maintain credibility within the organization.  In order to get the most effective feedback in a demo everyone needs to be able to hear, see and get involved.  Distributed demos need to focus on facilitating interaction more than in-person demos. Otherwise, distributed demos risk not being effective.

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