JMP

JMP

I use Microsoft Office, many of my clients use large ERP packages and last week I bought a highly functional math package to do data analysis. I would describe all of these as products that are refreshed over time by major and minor releases. As an outsider, the delineation of product and release is both easily recognizable and easily describable. However once you peel back the covers and dive into the inner workings of the typical corporate IT organization (broad definition that includes development, maintenance, support, security and more), how work is grouped and described can often be much more akin to a descent through Dante’s nine circles of hell.   Recently I sat in a conference room in front of a white board and challenged a group to identify how work was grouped and how the groupings related to each other. During the discussion we choose not to discuss the portfolio level within the organization and focus on the deliver functionality. The results followed a path that looked like a simple basic hierarchy running from programs, projects to sprints . . . except for the waterfall teams that don’t do sprints. This hierarchy  was crosscut by products and releases increasing the possible complexity of any particular scenario. As work is grouped together from sprints to program into larger and larger blocks additional layers of control are need to manage risk.

In Agile the smallest grouping of work is the sprint. In a perfect world, a team would accept work into a sprint where each story was independent and intrinsically motivating. Each piece of work would be its own big picture, however that scenario is at best rare. Most people are interested in knowing that they are helping build the Golden Gate Bridge, not just the left lane of a typical bridge on-ramp. We are more motivated when we believe we are doing something big. It is rare that a unit of work being delivered by a single sprint from a single team will require any scaling.

In most organizations, a project represents a grouping of work that most easily recognized. While the concept of a project is under-pressure in some circles (we will explore concepts such #NoProjects later) I haven’t sat next to anyone on plane that doesn’t describe their work as projects whether they are in marketing, sales, accounting, consulting or software. Projects and project accounting is firmly enforced in most organization’s finance and accounting departments. As noted in Projects in Agile, almost every organization has their own definition of a project. Interestingly, I was eating dinner with a group of developers and scrum masters recently when the conversation turned to the definition of project. A sizable group decided that any discrete task could be described as project. A task had a strart and an end and was goal oriented. From a grouping perspective, projects are typically an accumulation of sprints or releases in Agile. In more classic scenarios, a project can be described as one or more release into production. Any project that is more than a single team and a single team will require scaling to afford greater foresight and planning so that the pieces fit together in a coherent whole.

The definition of a release is widely variable. Releases can be subset of a project with functionality pushed to production, test  or into some other environment. Alternately a release could be a group of whole discrete projects that are moved into an environment together. The only common thread in the use of the term release is that it represents movement. Releases, other than in very uncomplicated environments, will always require coordination between development teams and operations, business and potentially customers. The larger and more complex the release, the more planning and coordination will be required.

Programs are groups of related and often inter-related projects or releases that are organized together to achieve a common goal. By definition programs are larger than projects and can be implemented through one or a large number of releases. Because they are larger and therefore more complex, programs typically require additional techniques to ensure foresight, planning and coordination so that all stakeholders understand what is happening and their role in achieving success.

A final grouping of work is around the concept of product. Building from the Software Engineering Institute’s definition of a software product line, a simple definition of a product could a set of related functions that are managed as a whole to satisfy a specific market need. Typically a product is developed through a project or program and is maintained through releases, projects and programs. Products should have a roadmap that provides internal and external customers guidance on the features that the organization intends to develop and deliver over time. Roadmaps are typically more granular in the near term and more speculative as the time horizon recedes.

As work is grouped from smallest to largest; from sprint to program or product added effort is required to organize and coordinate work. Increased levels of planning and coordination require additional tools and techniques in addition to the basics typically found in Scrum or Extreme Programing (XP). In the Agile vernacular, the need to for additional techniques to deal with size, coordination and planning is called scaling.

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