Check Mark

Check!

Understanding customer satisfaction is important. It might be more important for a product or services sold to someone outside the firm because of the link between satisfaction and sales —  no customers = no revenue. Understanding customer satisfaction for internal IT groups, groups that support the value chain, are often given short shrift. However, careers and budgets are influenced by satisfaction. Making sure you have the right approach and logistics for measuring internal customer satisfaction is critical for being successful. The questions described in earlier blog entries in this theme (see below) can be used as a really simple checklist. Review the questions below and answer them with either: yes, no, or no clue. 

Relevance 

___ Can we ask for information that will provide insight into our business goals?

___ Will collecting the information reflect stakeholder satisfaction with our product?

___ Can we use the data to provide an understanding of the satisfaction with how the
        product was developed and delivered?

___ Is the information useful for leaders’ decision making?

___ How easy will it be to consistently collect data?

___ How confident are we that questions asked will be answered truthfully?

Key:  Yes = 1 point  Don’t Know = -1 Point No = -3 Points

Scoring: A 3 or above is a score worth moving forward to the Usability questions. Scores of 2 to 0 should generate a lot of introspection and reworking of the goals. An overall negative score should send the idea of customer satisfaction measurement back for a substantial retrofit.

Usability 

___ How easy will the data collected be to derive comprehension?

___ Can actions be informed by information from these measures?
      (An alternative is to consider if an indicator shows a problem whether
      anything would be done to change the response.)

___ Are answers from different groups comparable?

___ What are the inherent biases in the questions? Is the information timely
      enough to improve the outcome for the team or product?

Key:  Yes = 1 point  Don’t Know = -1 Point No = -3 Points

Scoring: A 2 or above is a score worth moving forward to the Value questions. A score of  0 should generate a lot of introspection and reworking of the goals. An overall negative score is a shutdown signal.

Value:

___ Are the benefits going to be monitored and quantified?

___ Could those involved in measuring satisfaction being doing
      something of higher value?

___ Can the same information be gathered in a less costly manner?

Key:  Yes = 1 point  Don’t Know = -1 Point No = -3 Points

Scoring: A 1 or above is a score worth moving forward to the Value questions. Any negative score is a shutdown signal.

Self-sufficiency: 

___ Do those measuring customer satisfaction have the time to do the job well?

___ Is there a standard approach for measuring customer satisfaction?
      (The assumption is that if a standard approach exists it will be used.)

___ Is the approach documented?

___ Do those analyzing the measures have sufficient statistical training?
      (If in doubt, strike up a conversation about standard error, panicked looks = no.) 

___ Do those measuring have access to the right people?  

___ Do those asked about satisfaction answer?

___ Have the questions been reviewed to reduce bias?

___ Is mentoring and training available for those measuring customer satisfaction?

Key:  Yes = 1 point  Don’t Know = 0 Point No = -3 Points (No on the statistics questions is -7)

Scoring: There is a bit more tolerance of “don’t know” answers in this category. Skills can be marshaled using the first execution as a tool to generate momentum A 5 or above is a great starting point. Scores of 4 to 0 require mitigation (fix the problem).  An overall negative response should send everyone back to the drawing board worth moving forward to the Value questions. Any negative score is a shutdown signal.

The checklist is a quick inventory of where you stand before tackling internal customer satisfaction. We could debate whether a customer can exist inside of an organization or whether sponsors and major stakeholder opinions are more important than a clerk but unless we have the basics checked off we are getting ahead of ourselves.

Previous Entries in the Four Considerations Before Tackling Internal Customer Satisfaction Theme:

Why Measure Customer Satisfaction (Formally) In Internal IT Organizations – http://bit.ly/2tJ9rwB 

First Three Considerations Before Measuring Internal Customer Satisfaction – http://bit.ly/37kO8Ag 

Consider Self-Sufficiency Before Measuring Internal Customer Satisfaction – http://bit.ly/36FX8OZ