Agile


Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

SPaMCAST 499 will feature our essay on trust and coaching. Coaches are among most effective tools used to help teams improve. In SPaMCAST 496 – Sam Laing I highlighted the need for trust between a coach and the team or person they are coaching. Without trust, a coach will not be very effective.  Two powerful and related tools!

In the rocker as they call it stock car racing is Wolfram Müller. Wolfram co-authored Hyper-Productive Knowledge Work Performance, The TameFlow Approach with Steve Tendon.  We talk about Chapter 23 titled Reliable Scrum and Reliable Kanban. Wolfram can be found on LinkedIn at https://bit.ly/2qXvgnw

Anchoring the cast is the Software Sensei, Kim Pries.  Kim discusses software safety. Tools and software languages can have a major impact on software safety and all of our lives depend on software these days!

Re-Read Saturday News

In week 14 of our re-read of L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around!  we begin Part IV of Turn The Ship Around and tackle chapter 21. The first three parts of the book bring the story to the beginning of deployment of the Santa Fe.  Part IV picks up from that point! (more…)

Advertisements
Dawn over Lake Erie

An interlude before the day begins!

I am studying for and taking tests and assessments this week, which has thrown my cadence off a bit.  This essay was intended to be a deeper dive into cost in the world of agile metrics, but studying came first.  Therefore a useful interlude:

Agile metrics are important because internal and external stakeholders have questions to which they want answers.  Agile admonishes organizations to focus on outcomes as the most critical measure of success. The statement is hard to argue with but provides an incomplete picture. Defining outcomes is useful for addressing the nuances of stakeholder questions.  Outcomes are “things” of consequence. For a development organization, regardless of external or internal focus, the “things” of consequence they deliver are features, functions or services – enabled by code. As organizations grow and mature they must start to deal with the hard questions (internally first) well before customer satisfaction falls or other stakeholders begin asking.

Questions that need to be asked and answered include:

  1. Are we delivering enough outcomes?
  2. Are we spending too much to deliver an outcome?
  3. Are we spending too much (or too little) to support our code base?
  4. Which features, modules or products are providing the highest return?
  5. Are we staffed correctly?

All of these questions are important.  Depending on where you are in your organization’s life cycle, these questions become critical.  We will discuss a framework to address these questions in the near future but until then are there other questions to add to the list?

Additional reading on return —

Metrics Minute: Return on Investment (ROI)
https://tcagley.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/metrics-minute-return-on-investment-roi/

Metrics Minute: Return on Assets (ROA)
https://tcagley.wordpress.com/2011/06/18/metrics-minute-return-on-assets-roa/

 

Progress is easy to visualize when we use the yardstick of calendar time. My wife and I spent 17 days in Europe. There are 197 shopping days until Christmas (as of June 12, 2018) — I expect presents this year. How long it takes to deliver a piece of work, in days, is something nearly every human can understand. Over the past few months, I have been cataloging questions I have heard. Well over 70% of work-related questions center on how long a piece of work will take and whether the answer to that question has value. Cycle time metrics are ways to generate answers to ‘how long’ questions in a manner that is valuable and predictable. (more…)

Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

SPaMCAST 498 features our interview John Kordyback.  Agile is more than just Scrum or a bunch values. Agile has a technical side that can’t be ignored. This week, John and I have a wide-ranging conversation covering the technical side of agile, the impact of tools on principles, and the difference in agile approaches for systems of engagement and systems of record.

Bio:

John Kordyback is a Principal Consultant with ThoughtWorks leading technology transformations and applying lean principles within complex enterprises. He is a strong advocate for applying the lean delivery and operational practices found in the Devops and Evolutionary Architecture movements to gain more value from existing technology investments. John has worked in insurance, telecommunications, commodity and securities trading, high tech, energy, and the airline industries. Before his technology career, John worked as a researcher and practitioner for people with disabilities.

Email: jkordyba@thoughtworks.com

Twitter: @jkordyback

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we tackle chapter 20 of L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around! (have you bought your copy?). Chapter 20 completes part 3 which has focused on competence and the run-up to the deployment of the Santa Fe. The title of this chapter is Final Preparations.  We have six or seven weeks left – Steven Adams is pushing for the next book to be Release It, the other option is The Checklist Manifesto.  Both are great . . . thoughts?

Current Installment:

Week 13: Final Preparations –  https://bit.ly/2t1OgSn (more…)

Not a bed of roses but rather a . . .

Trust is an important factor in decision making. The higher the level of trust in the in the information you are receiving or people involved in a decision, the easier it will be to make a decision. Easier, in this scenario, equates to using trust as a filter or qualifier of information. Filtering information does not always generate the best decision. When trust is a filter, trust intensifies many cognitive biases. There are more than a few cognitive biases that reduce the amount of perceived uncertainty and risk attributed to a decision. For example, I trust my wife’s ability to see color (she is an award-winning graphic designer and I am color blind).  When picking out clothes for work or an evening on the town I am disadvantaged and I am at risk of creating a bad impression. My trust in her ability to match colors reduces the uncertainty and risk that I will have glaring color mismatches (unless I have irritated her before asking for help). Examples of cognitive biases impacted by trust include the following: (more…)

Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

SPaMCAST 497 features our essay on micromanagement.  Micromanagement is a bane to employees that fall under a micromanager’s control. If you ask any manager if they think micromanagement is useful they will tell you no.  The problem is that many managers still do it and then rationalize the behavior.

We also welcome back Dr. Susan Parente, with her “Not a Scrumdamentalist” column.  In this installment, Susan discusses using hybrid agile methods to deliver value. The message is that the development approach needs to meld with the organization’s culture.

Gene Hughson brings the cast home with another entry from his Form Follows Function blog.  In this installment Gene discusses his essay, Getting a handle on IT costs by eliminating chargebacks?  IT costs are a chronic problem. Ideas for getting a handle on costs are always useful.

Re-Read Saturday News

In week twelve of the re-read of L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around!  (Buy your copy now).  This week we tackle Underway for San Diego and All Present and Accounted For.  Two more tools that are immediately useful.

Current Installment:

Week 12: Underway for San Diego and All Present and Accounted Forhttps://bit.ly/2J7AkRx (more…)

Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

SPaMCAST 496 features our interview with Sam Laing.  Sam and I talked about coaching agile teams. The goal of coaching is to help people unleash their inner power.  We also touch on the difference between coaching and mentoring. They are different and require different approaches but both are useful!

 

Sam’s Bio – Sam writes:

Samantha Laing (@samlaing)

My personal motto is ‘be brave’, and I embody this by taking on challenges one small step at a time.

Most of my career has been in the IT industry, specifically Software Development. Nowadays I find myself guiding and mentoring others with a passion for agile. This year my focus has been on experimenting and learning from my failures (and successes) – what a great journey so far.

Contact Sam at:

sam@growingagile.co.za
http://www.growingagile.co.za

 

Re-Read Saturday News

In week eleven of the re-read of L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around!  (Buy Your Copy Now).  This week we begin Part III of the book and add two more mechanisms to our tool belt.  This week the two chapters are Mistakes Just Happen and We Learn.

Current Installment:

Week 11: Mistakes Just Happen and We Learnhttps://bit.ly/2IMZYL2


Previous Installments: (more…)

Next Page »