Agile


Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

The Software Process and Measurement Cast 477 features our essay on silence.  Silence is a powerful tool to guide conversations and mine information from the stream of consciousness that flows around us. If silence was just a tool to improve our connections with people and to improve listening, it would be worth practicing. But, silence is also a tool to peer deeper into our minds. Silence improves relaxation and helps individuals to focus.  Trust me the podcast is not 30 minutes of silence!

We will also have a column from Kim Pries, the Software Sensi.  Kim brings us part one of his essay, Muddling Through.  The essay is based on the article, “The Science of “Muddling Through” by Charles E. Lindblom.  The article was originally published in 1959 but has an important message that resonates now.

Gene Hughson of Form Follows Function anchors the cast.  He discusses his great article, “What Makes a Monolith Monolithic?” Gene suggests that the problem with the term “monolith” is that, while it’s a powerfully evocative term, it isn’t a simple one to define.   (more…)

Advertisements

User stories tend to follow a hierarchy that follows the decomposition of a business need or idea into granular pieces of functionality.  That decomposition follows a basic workflow that starts when the story is voiced and ends when it is built. Along the way, each user story passes through different states that hopefully end with functionality being delivered and the story marked as done!

All three concepts are important in order to use the concept of user stories in a dynamic environment where agile and lean work is pursued.  An example is helpful to see how a user story hierarchy, flow, and states fit together.    In the following example, we will follow an automotive example to highlight the user story hierarchy, how the item impacts the user story flow, and which user story states apply to the hierarchy.  (more…)

Some states are entrances!

User stories are a way of stating requirements.  Ron Jefferies coined the meme, the Three Cs to describe a user story.  The 3 Cs are:

  1. card,
  2. conversation, and
  3. confirmation.

The idea of a card was to keep the user story short to avoid making the requirement overly complex and to avoid analysis paralysis. Because the card was a short statement of the user story, conversations are required to expose the nuances of the user story (note: nowhere does it say NOT to document your conversations. If someone tells you not to document your conversations, forget them!).  Finally, the third C, confirmation equates to testable statements that allow the team to know when the user story is satisfied. User stories might begin as nebulous statements, however, when groomed, a well-formed story provides strong guidance on the business need to be addressed.

User stories pass through four basic states. (more…)

Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

The Software Process and Measurement Cast 476 features our interview with Kyle Siemens.  Kyle is CEO at Brightest. We discussed the case for certifications. The whole concept of certifications is a lightning rod for the excesses of agile and the Agile (big A) industry.  Mr. Siemens makes a strong argument for certification when done properly.

Kyle’s Bio

Kyle Siemens is an energetic, loyal and hard-working Canadian from Winnipeg, Manitoba. After completing my Bachelor’s degree at the University of Manitoba in German literature and mathematics, I moved to Berlin in 2006 with a DAAD scholarship and got my Masters in communication and languages. After working several years at various agencies (running campaigns for national and international brands), I stumbled upon an incredible path by chance, which led me to where I am today – Online Marketing Volunteer of the TMMi Foundation and CEO of a global ISTQB exam provider called Brightest: www.brightest.org.

Reach out to Kyle on LinkedIn

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we tackled Chapter 10 of Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability: An Introduction by Daniel S. Vacanti. Today we begin Part 3 with Chapter 10 which is titled, Introduction to Cycle Time Scatterplots. Scatterplots take us beyond the analysis of average cycle time (or even approximate average cycle time).  Scatterplots provide a visual representation of the data so we can begin to use the data to predict the future.  Remember to buy your copy today and read along, and we will be back next week!

Previous Installments

Introduction and Game Plan
Week 2: Flow, Flow Metrics, and Predictability
Week 3: The Basics of Flow Metrics
Week 4: An Introduction to Little’s Law
Week 5: Introduction to CFDs
Week 6: Workflow Metrics and CFDs
Week 7: Flow Metrics and CFSs
Week 8: Conservation of Flow, Part I
Week 9: Conservation of Flow, Part II
Week 10: Flow Debt
Week 11: Introduction to Cycle Time Scatterplots

Support the author (and the blog), buy a copy of Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability: An Introduction by Daniel S. Vacanti (more…)

Differing definitions are a lot like swimming without a lifeguard!

A user story – a brief, simple requirement statement from the user’s perspective – tends to follow a loose life cycle.  That life often begins even before the word user story gets mentioned or even by people that understand (or care to understand) the concept of a user story.  

The basic life cycle of a user story includes the following states: (more…)

Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

The Software Process and Measurement Cast 475 features the majority of the SPaMCAST Crew in a round robin discussion.  The recording session covered three topics; however, today we tackle the first topic: Whether agile can be used in other parts of the business.  We will return to the next two topics in February!  Six people with strong opinions. It is a pretty amazing discussion.

Voices you often hear on the SPaMCAST include this cast of incredible minds:

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we take a break from our re-read of Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability: An Introduction by Daniel S. Vacanti. Remember to buy your copy today and read along, and we will be back next week! (more…)

Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

The Software Process and Measurement Cast 474 features our interview with Tom Henricksen.  Tom recently organized and executed the Agile Online Summit that I participated in.  We get the behind the scene story about how the Summit came together and how it enhanced the Agile community!

Tom’s Bio

Tom Henricksen is a speaker and career coach who leads others to turn their dreams into plans. Throughout Tom’s career, he has learned firsthand how hard it can be to find a good career match. As a result of his trials, he’s created a simple process designed to help find a career that inspires passion, encourages optimal performance, and results in profit.

Website: http://myitcareercoach.com/

Online Agile Summit: https://www.agileonlinesummit.com/

Twitter: @TomHenricksen

Facebook: Facebook profile

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tomhenricksen

Re-Read Saturday News

Chapter 9 of Daniel S. Vacanti’s Actionable  Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability: An Introduction (buy a copy today) is titled, “Flow Debt.”  In this chapter, we use the approximate average cycle time to guide teams and other stakeholders to asking good questions so that the flow of value can be improved!  Buy your copy today and read along! (more…)

Next Page »