Management


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The Software Process and Measurement Cast 437 features a discussion of our recent re-read of  The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni (Jossey-Bass, Copyright 2002, 33rd printing) with Steven Adams.  Steve has participated on nearly all of the re-reads, providing his unique wisdom.  It was a great talk that helped me understand why the book has (and continues to have) such a large impact on how I view Agile and software development. Steve also has some advice on how to get the most out of the re-read feature.

Steve lives in the San Francisco Bay Area (a.k.a, Silicon Valley) where he has a successful career in software development.  Steve has worked for Hewlett Packard, Access Systems Inc,, Trilliant Inc., and Sony Mobile Communications; plus has consulted at Cisco Systems.  Steve has a computer science degree from California State University at Chico, learned software project management at Hewlett-Packard and, in 2009, started his Agile journey with Sony Ericsson.  Steve enjoys listening to technical podcasts, and SPaMCAST was one of the first and is a favorite!  Steve is also an avid bicyclist (road) and is on track to log over 3,500 miles in 2016.

Blog: https://sadams510.wordpress.com/

Twitter: @stevena510

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we begin our read of Holacracy with a few logistics and a review of the introduction.  We have a short entry this week that will give you time to buy a copy today and read along!  If you have not listened to my interview with Jeff Dalton on Software Process and Measurement Cast 433, I would suggest a quick listen. Jeff has practical experience with using the concepts of holacracy in his company and as a tool in his consultancy.  

Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World by Brian J. Robertson was published by Henry Holt and Company in 2015.  The book is comprised of a forward, 10 chapters in three parts, notes, acknowledgments, and an index.  My plan is to read and review one chapter per week.  We will move on to a new book in approximately 12 weeks.

Visit the Software Process and Measurement Cast blog to participate in this and previous re-reads. (more…)

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The Software Process and Measurement Cast 432 begins with an essay on the impact of leadership types on adopting and sustaining Agile.  Leadership style has a direct impact on an organization’s ability to adopt and sustain Agile.  Some leadership styles are more supportive, while others evoke more of a response that is epitomized by locking feral cats and dogs in a room (nobody wins).

Next up, Jeremy Berriault brings his QA Corner to the cast to discuss surprises in QA testing.  Visit Jeremy’s blog at https://jberria.wordpress.com/  Next we will have a column from The Software Sensei, Kim Pries.  Kim discusses the holy trinity of forethought, execution and follow through. Reach out to Kim on LinkedIn. Last, but not least, Jon M Quigley brings his column, the Alpha and Omega of Product Development, to the Cast. In this segment, Jon discusses on-boarding. On-boarding new people is critical even if the person is just joining from another team down the hall.  One of the places you can find Jon is at Value Transformation LLC.

Re-Read Saturday News

This week  we tackle Chapter 5 in Carol Dweck’s Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (buy your copy and read along).  In Chapter 5, Dweck uses examples from the business world to illustrate and elaborate on fixed and growth mindsets.

Every week we discuss a chapter then consider the implications of what we have “read” from the point of view of someone pursuing an organizational transformation and also how to use the material when coaching teams.   (more…)

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The Software Process and Measurement Cast 420 features our interview with John Hunter.  John is a SPaMCAST alumni; John first appeared on SPaMCAST 226 to talk about why management matters.  In this podcast John returns to discuss building capability in the organization and  understanding the impact of  variation.  We also talked Deming and why people tack the word improvement on almost anything!   

John’s Bio

John Hunter has served as an information technology program manager for the Office of Secretary of Defense Quality Management Office, the White House Military Office and the American Society for Engineering Education.

In 2013, he published his first book – Management Matters: Building Enterprise Capability.

John created and operates one of the first, and still one of the most popular, management resources on the internet.  He continues to aid managers in their efforts to improve their organizations with an emphasis on software development and leveraging the internet.  His blog is widely recognized as a valuable resource for leaders and managers with a focus on improving the practice of management in organizations.

Re-Read Saturday News

In this week’s re-read of The Five Dysfunctions of a Team  by Patrick Lencioni (Jossey-Bass, Copyright 2002, 33rd printing), we tackle the sections titled Accountability, Individual Contributor, and The Talk.  We are getting close to the end of the novel portion of the book but over the next few weeks, we have a number of ideas to extract from the book before we review the model. (more…)

Picture of standard poodle

Leadership Is Not All Puppies!

Servant leadership is a powerful tool to unlock the ability of teams or groups to deliver value. As we have found, servant leadership unlocks several of the principles that underlie the Agile Manifesto.  Despite the linkage to Agile, applying servant leadership is not all puppies and kittens. There is no one perfect style of management or leadership, and servant leadership is only one of those styles. Different types of people and different contexts mean that servant leadership does not fit every organization’s need.  There are several criticisms of servant leadership that can illuminate who shouldn’t use servant management and in which contexts to avoid the style.  Below are some common criticisms of the style, along with my comments on those critiques: (more…)

Scaling!

Leading the way!

Participative management styles are often used by Agile teams.  Participative management styles are perceived to be more flexible. Flexibility allows teams to immediately react to the feedback they receive as they work rather than wait until it is too late to react. Flexibility is a core principle of Agile; however, scaling Agile requires trading some of the flexibility of participative management styles for more control.  More control is needed due to the increased size of both team and work and the increased level of risk large pieces of work typically represent.    (more…)

Baseball Game

Teams and situations require different management styles.

Every team may leverage several styles of management to deliver value most efficiently. In Agile teams, some styles are used more often than others. The default management style for Agile teams tends to be participative, but management style is affected by team size, context, and role. (more…)

Follow me this way!

Follow me this way!

Most any substantive of discussion of Agile sooner or later turns to leadership.  As teams embrace the principles in the Agile Manifesto that foster self-organization and self-management, they often require a shift away from classic management techniques.  In some cases, as teams begin exploring Agile the idea of management becomes an anathema, while in other cases, the concepts of leadership and management are conflated. Leadership and management are not the same thing and in most organizations, both are required. (more…)

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