Management


checklist-manifesto Book

In week 5 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we tackle Chapter 4, The Idea. In Chapter 4 Gawande shows us how checklists can help push decision-making outward, which empowers teams and makes them more responsive.

For simple routine problems, forcing functions have great appeal.  I put my company badge and car keys in the same place, everyday – check. I put my lunch box in the freezer — check. I am home — check. A simple routine checklist that makes going to work in the morning less complicated. The checklist for routine problems can be spelled out in great detail to precipitate behaviors. That said, not everything we face in day-to-day or business environments is routine. (more…)

Sushi Rice and Tofu Bowl

Don’t assume no meat mean no taste!

Monte Carlo analysis provides a way to handle answering questions with significant uncertainty in the inputs that influence the outcome of the work so you can have the difficult “when, what, and how much” type conversations with sponsors, stakeholders, and marketing people. That definition is an explicit admission that almost ALL of the hard questions asked about projects cannot be answered using simple a + b = c formulas or arguments. This leads us to use tools like Monte Carlo analysis. There are four common assumptions often overlooked or misunderstood when using Monte Carlo methods. (more…)

Book Cover

This week we tackle chapter 20 of L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around! (have you bought your copy?). Chapter 20 completes part 3 which has focused on competence and the run-up to the deployment of the Santa Fe. The title of this chapter is Final Preparations.  We have six or seven weeks left  – Steven Adams is pushing for re-reading Release It, the other option is The Checklist Manifesto.  Both are great . . . thoughts? (more…)

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SPaMCAST 497 features our essay on micromanagement.  Micromanagement is a bane to employees that fall under a micromanager’s control. If you ask any manager if they think micromanagement is useful they will tell you no.  The problem is that many managers still do it and then rationalize the behavior.

We also welcome back Dr. Susan Parente, with her “Not a Scrumdamentalist” column.  In this installment, Susan discusses using hybrid agile methods to deliver value. The message is that the development approach needs to meld with the organization’s culture.

Gene Hughson brings the cast home with another entry from his Form Follows Function blog.  In this installment Gene discusses his essay, Getting a handle on IT costs by eliminating chargebacks?  IT costs are a chronic problem. Ideas for getting a handle on costs are always useful.

Re-Read Saturday News

In week twelve of the re-read of L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around!  (Buy your copy now).  This week we tackle Underway for San Diego and All Present and Accounted For.  Two more tools that are immediately useful.

Current Installment:

Week 12: Underway for San Diego and All Present and Accounted Forhttps://bit.ly/2J7AkRx (more…)

At least 99% of the time, micromanagement is bad. It would be nice if we could wave a magic wand and break the cycle of micromanagement. It would be equally as nice if just recognizing that you were a micromanager was enough to change the behavior. While knowing is part of the battle, micromanagement is an addiction that requires effort to stop. There are several steps I have found useful that can be taken to breaking the addiction of micromanagement (more…)

Sometimes . . .

Micromanagement is a type of authoritarian leadership. In general, this form of leadership is harmful because the manager exerts excessive control and/or pays excessive attention to details. The subordinates of micromanagers have little to no freedom of thought or action. This form of management is stark and easy to recognize from the outside. However, it is often difficult to recognize in ourselves. There are several useful questions to alert a manager to the possibility that they are a micromanager. (more…)

Book Cover

In week ten of the re-read of L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around! we add two more mechanisms for control and complete part two the book. This week the two chapters are A New Ship and We Have A Problem. (more…)

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