Logistics Are Part of All Meetings

Planning Meetings are not terribly glamorous.  They are, however, an important first step in effectively delivering value for any sprint or increment.  I have developed a simple checklist for preparing for a planning meeting (we will explore a simple process in the near future).  Agile planning events couple the discipline of saying what will be done and then delivering on that promise with the need to embrace the dynamic nature of development and maintenance. (more…)

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SPaMCAST 450 features our essay on Product Roadmaps.  Roadmaps link an organization’s strategy to action. Product roadmaps are directional and answer the question of where we are going and why. As with any powerful tool, roadmaps giveth when used wisely and taketh away when used less wisely.

We also visit with Gene Hughson.  Gene brings his great Form Follows Function blog to the podcast.  We discussed the entry Holistic Architecture – Keeping the Gears Turning.  After you listen to our conversation remember that roadmaps are a way to avoid your products not to resemble a bunch of spare parts flying in close formation.

Re-Read Saturday News

Today we will begin the next book in the Re-read Saturday Series, The Science of Successful Organizational Change. Steven Adams (SPaMCAST 437, SPaMCAST 412 and nearly every entry in the Re-read Saturday series) will lead this re-read.   Remember to use the link to buy a copy to support the podcast and blog.

Steven begins the re-read by describing how he found the Paul Gibbon’s book “The Science of Successful Organizational Change” (get your copy) searching “Agile Change Management” on Amazon.  

A Call To Action

You can help the podcast. If you even got a single new idea this week while listening to the podcast, please give the SPaMCAST a short, honest review in iTunes, Stitcher or wherever you are listening.  If you leave a review somewhere, please send a copy to spamcastinfo@gmail.com.  Reviews help guide people to the cast!

Next SPaMCAST

SPaMCAST 451  will feature our interview with James Shore.  We began with a discussion of the Agile Fluency Model, the concepts, and ideas that led to the model and then got into topics such as whether Agile can ever be method agnostic.  

Shameless Ad for my book!

Mastering Software Project Management: Best Practices, Tools and Techniques co-authored by Murali Chematuri and myself and published by J. Ross Publishing. We have received unsolicited reviews like the following: “This book will prove that software projects should not be a tedious process, for you or your team.” Support SPaMCAST by buying the book here. Available in English and Chinese.

The Science of Successful Organizational Change

The Science of Successful Organizational Change

The Science of Successful Organizational Change: Re-read Week 1, Introduction

Today we will begin the next book in the Re-read Saturday Series, The Science of Successful Organizational Change. Steven Adams (SPaMCAST 437, SPaMCAST 412 and nearly every entry in the Re-read Saturday series) will lead this re-read.   Remember to use the link to buy a copy to support the podcast and blog.  In the first installment, Steven will introduce the book, his plan for the re-read, and tackle the introduction.  I will add comments after each installment has been published.  Please share your comments!

The Science of Successful Organizational Change: Re-read led by Steven Adams

Introduction

I stumbled into Paul Gibbons’ book “The Science of Successful Organizational Change” (get your copy).  I was searching Amazon for “Agile Change Management”.  The book’s sub-title “How Leaders Set Strategy, Change Behavior, and Create an Agile Culture” helped reveal this title to me in the search results. (more…)

A Stack of Business Books

Books

The beginning of July is a good point to take a step back and consider the path of you are on, 2017 is just over half over.  A retrospective of sorts is in order.  Just like any other retrospective, the goal is to change the trajectory of the path you are on.  Changing the path you are on is important even if 2017 has been the best year ever.  As leaders, we often exhort those around us to embrace continuous process improvement as a path to improve our teams or organizations.  Just as important as process improvement is the need for continuous personal improvement.  As a first step towards continuous process improvement, every person should identify the goal they are working toward.  The next step toward that goal needs to be the most important task (MIT) you address every day.  One of my primary personal goals is to not get stuck in a rut and to continue learning.  My most important task, every day is to take a step on the path towards continuous learning.  Planning my day begins with identifying my MIT for the day, whether that is researching and writing a blog entry, recording and editing an interview for the Software Process and Measurement Cast or reading a few pages in a book one of my first tasks begins by checking my MIT off the list. (more…)

Travel outside of your comfort zone helps to establish your beginner’s mindset.

Audio Version:  SPaMCAST 177

Why is it easier for some organizations to innovate? Why do some organizations become less flexible after a new idea is successfully implemented? I believe that the concept of the beginner’s mind holds a substantial clue about why some people and organizations either embrace or resist change.

The beginner’s mind is a concept from Zen Buddhism known as Shoshin.  It refers to having an attitude of openness, eagerness, and lack of preconceptions when studying a subject.  The beginner’s mind can be present even when studying at an advanced level.  Quoting the Zen teacher Shunryu Suzuki, “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, in the expert’s mind there are few.”  The beginner’s mind embodies the emotional qualities of enthusiasm, creativity and optimism.  These qualities are critical for tackling tough problems and for innovation.  The beginner’s mind is just one framework for understanding why some organizations and individuals seems to embrace the boundlessness of the environment around them but nevertheless it is a powerful tool for self-reflection or judging change readiness.

I would like to address the idea of change willingness through the filter of the beginner’s mind from two perspectives: The first is from the point of view of the constraints we accept or create for ourselves and our organizations, and the second would be to reflect on attributes that help us accelerate embracing change. (more…)

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SPaMCAST 449 features our interview with Jasveer Singh.  We discussed his new book, Functional Software Size Measurement Methodology with Effort Estimation and Performance Indication.  Jasveer proposes a new sizing methodology for estimation and other measurement processes.

Jasveer Singh holds a Master of Technology degree in Computer Technology from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, and has studied Executive Master in Management at École de Commerce Solvay, Brussels, Belgium.

He has about 30 years of valuable senior-level international experience in the ICT area and has worked in the top IT/Telecom equipment manufacturer, operator, consultancy, and service companies in different countries (Bharat Electronics Limited, Alcatel, Siemens Business Services, WorldCom, Logica, and Sigos in India, France, Australia, Belgium, and Germany). A significant part of this experience has been in the management of software development (analysis, design, coding, testing), system design, quality assurance/control, and project management while working with different programming languages, object-oriented technology, database management systems, etc. His in-depth experience in these software domains led him to realize the improvements needed in the currently available methodologies for software size measurement and to develop the Functional Software Size Measurement Methodology with Effort Estimation and Performance Indication (FSSM) which is a thorough methodology and great help for software projects.

Currently, he is based in Belgium and is the director of EUSFP.

E-mail: js@fssm.software

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasveer-singh-11230a12/

FSSM book: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1119238056.html

FSSM online book: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/book/10.1002/9781119238126

FSSM website: www.fssm.software

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we wrap up our re-read of  Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World by Brian J. Robertson which was published by Henry Holt and Company in 2015. The concepts in Holacracy are an important addition to the discussion of management, governance, and leadership in the 21st Century.  Read or re-read this week’s installment for more thoughts and comments!   

Catch up on the all of the Holacracy entries: (more…)

Book Cover

Holacracy

Next week we will begin the next book, The Science of Successful Organizational Change. Remember to use the link to buy a copy to support the podcast and blog. Remember, the reread will be led by Steven Adams. I will be posting follow-on comments as we go!

Holacracy: The New Management System for a Rapidly Changing World presents a mechanism to redistribute authority and improve decision-making processes.  Holacracy is very different from the common hierarchical corporate management structure currently in use.  That difference means that we have to read this book with the knowledge that unless we are working at Zappos or a few other avant-garde companies, many of these concepts are something in our future.  Four comments about the book and Holacracy in general that need to be made in closing: (more…)