Sometimes you just have to . . .

You can never put a genie back into a bottle.  In I Messed Up A Scrum Team Should I Do Kanban? We described a scenario where a well-performing Scrum team had their Scrum Master replaced and troubles ensued. The question that was posed was whether—since scrum was no longer working—perhaps kanban should be adopted. Given the tumult at the team level, putting the genie back in the bottle and pretending nothing has happened is not a good strategy.  Assuming the leadership issues have been addressed the question returns to whether to recommit to Scrum, shift to Kanban or combine the two. (more…)

Sometimes you just have to . . .

A friend and colleague recently presented me with a scenario and then as the punchline asked for more ammunition to alleviate the problem.  

The Scenario: (more…)

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SPaMCAST features our interview with Julia Wester.  Julia returns to the cast to discuss spectrum thinking.  Specturn thinking is an important tool in system thinking and required to address complexity.  Even though using binary thinking is rarely the most effective path, it is rare to use spectrum thinking to address problems. Julia provides a path to more effective decision making.

Julia’s Bio

Julia is a Co-Founder of Lagom Solutions and its Principal Consultant. Lagom Solutions is an outcome-focused consulting and product company. Julia leads the consulting side of Lagom Solutions. When working with customers, she leverages her 18 years of experience working in and managing high-performing teams at companies such as Turner Broadcasting, F5 Networks, and LeanKit. Julia is passionate about teaching others how to tame the chaos of everyday work by embracing transparency, continuous improvement, and a lagom mindset. She also loves talking about how management doesn’t have to be a dirty word. Julia blogs at everydaykanban.com and tweets at @everydaykanban.

Re-Read Saturday News
This week we continue our re-read of The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell. In Chapter one, Gladwell suggests that there are three factors that impact whether an idea or product crosses a tipping point; they are the law of the few, the stickiness factor, and the power of context. Chapter one introduces these concepts and presents real-life examples to illustrate the factors. Dust off your copy or buy a new copy.

Current entry:

Week 2 – The Three Rules of Epidemicshttps://bit.ly/2DQnRNV (more…)

Tipping Point

This week we continue our re-read of The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell (Buy a copy and read along). In Chapter one, Gladwell suggests that there are three factors that impact whether an idea or product crosses a tipping point; they are the law of the few, the stickiness factor, and the power of context. Chapter one introduces these concepts and presents real-life examples to illustrate the factors.   (more…)

 

Once you get to the point that you know you are going to have to interface a SAFe release train(s), with a waterfall program run outside your organization, success generally turns on three very related topics.  The three topics are transparency, synchronization, and code.  The timing of when the code from all parties is available and managing when the code can be integrated and tested is critical. Even if both programs produce the right code and the code works as it is expected, each program will produce functional code at very different times.  By definition waterfall projects create code after they have done a large part of the analysis and design while teams in a SAFe release train will have functional, demonstrable code earlier. By the time the waterfall project is ready to write code the agile project will have a significant investment in a code base.   Three suggested approaches (in addition to transparency and synchronization) for addressing the risk generated by the differential in code timing are: (more…)

millaa millaa falls

In our essay, Can Agile (SAFe) Be Interfaced With Waterfall?, we identified three major areas that had to be addressed so that a multiple inter-related programs with different management approaches didn’t turn into a train wreck.  Keeping related programs moving in the same direction is important, and synchronization is critical. In a recent interview for a future SPaMCAST Alan Shalloway, CEO of NetDynamics, reminded me that the more complicated we make work, the more we reduce flow and increase the probability of making mistakes. Staking the organization’s success to integrating two programs moving at different speeds is complicated. Synchronizing successfully requires spending time and money to keep the programs synchronized. Three effective techniques used to implement synchronization are: (more…)

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SPaMCAST 531 features our essay on Balancing Control and Self-Organization to Avoid Heat Death.  Control and self-organization represent a classic Goldilocks and the Three Bears problem. We discuss whether there is a solution. Interested in more on this topic?  Other blog entries include:

Balancing Control and Self-Organization to Avoid Heat Deathhttps://bit.ly/2UnzfGu  

Balancing of Autonomy with Alignmenthttps://bit.ly/2Sg1xFy  

VUCA, Heat Death and Gray Goohttps://bit.ly/2RhlGq8

In the second spot this week we hear from Jon M Quigley who brings his Alpha and Omega of Product Development to the cast.  Jon discusses the impact of cognitive biases on product development. Fighting biases is an important role for product owners and developers alike. The fight is rarely easy.

Re-Read Saturday News
This week we begin our re-read of The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell. We are re-reading this book because it is important for any person involved in leading or participating in change (this is all of us).  Dust off your copy or buy a new copy.

Current entry:

Week 1 – Plans and Introductionhttps://bit.ly/2S8PPwc

Next SPaMCAST
SPaMCAST 532 will feature our interview with Julia Wester.  Julia returns to the cast to discuss her passion for the topic of spectrum thinking.  Rarely is using binary thinking the most effective path; however, it is rare to use spectrum thinking to address problems. Julia provides a path to more effective decision making.