Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

The Software Process and Measurement Cast 477 features our essay on silence.  Silence is a powerful tool to guide conversations and mine information from the stream of consciousness that flows around us. If silence was just a tool to improve our connections with people and to improve listening, it would be worth practicing. But, silence is also a tool to peer deeper into our minds. Silence improves relaxation and helps individuals to focus.  Trust me the podcast is not 30 minutes of silence!

We will also have a column from Kim Pries, the Software Sensi.  Kim brings us part one of his essay, Muddling Through.  The essay is based on the article, “The Science of “Muddling Through” by Charles E. Lindblom.  The article was originally published in 1959 but has an important message that resonates now.

Gene Hughson of Form Follows Function anchors the cast.  He discusses his great article, “What Makes a Monolith Monolithic?” Gene suggests that the problem with the term “monolith” is that, while it’s a powerfully evocative term, it isn’t a simple one to define.   (more…)

Advertisements

A New Copy!

Chapter 10A of Daniel S. Vacanti’s Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability: An Introduction (buy a copy today) is a very short chapter (I should have planned to include this in chapter 10B, but hindsight is 20/20) covering a discussion of histograms but given the time and space we can spend additional time with an example.  The chapter is titled Cycle Time Histograms.   (more…)

User stories tend to follow a hierarchy that follows the decomposition of a business need or idea into granular pieces of functionality.  That decomposition follows a basic workflow that starts when the story is voiced and ends when it is built. Along the way, each user story passes through different states that hopefully end with functionality being delivered and the story marked as done!

All three concepts are important in order to use the concept of user stories in a dynamic environment where agile and lean work is pursued.  An example is helpful to see how a user story hierarchy, flow, and states fit together.    In the following example, we will follow an automotive example to highlight the user story hierarchy, how the item impacts the user story flow, and which user story states apply to the hierarchy.  (more…)

Some states are entrances!

User stories are a way of stating requirements.  Ron Jefferies coined the meme, the Three Cs to describe a user story.  The 3 Cs are:

  1. card,
  2. conversation, and
  3. confirmation.

The idea of a card was to keep the user story short to avoid making the requirement overly complex and to avoid analysis paralysis. Because the card was a short statement of the user story, conversations are required to expose the nuances of the user story (note: nowhere does it say NOT to document your conversations. If someone tells you not to document your conversations, forget them!).  Finally, the third C, confirmation equates to testable statements that allow the team to know when the user story is satisfied. User stories might begin as nebulous statements, however, when groomed, a well-formed story provides strong guidance on the business need to be addressed.

User stories pass through four basic states. (more…)

The current is just below the surface!

Where do user stories come from and where do they go?  Agile or not, the requirements, needs, and nuances of users and customers need to be collected, written down, prioritized, and groomed.  Even though this process sounds linear it usually happens over and over again during the cycle of value delivery.  The of techniques for gathering requirements and translating those requirements into products, features, epics and user stories are varied, and we will explore them. However, first, we need to define the typical path.   We will pick the journey up after strategic definition/vision (described in our article on hierarchy)  has been identified just as or before product definition.  Here is the basic flow: (more…)

Differing definitions are a lot like swimming without a lifeguard!

A user story – a brief, simple requirement statement from the user’s perspective – tends to follow a loose life cycle.  That life often begins even before the word user story gets mentioned or even by people that understand (or care to understand) the concept of a user story.  

The basic life cycle of a user story includes the following states: (more…)

Listen Now
Subscribe: Apple Podcast
Check out the podcast on Google Play Music

The Software Process and Measurement Cast 475 features the majority of the SPaMCAST Crew in a round robin discussion.  The recording session covered three topics; however, today we tackle the first topic: Whether agile can be used in other parts of the business.  We will return to the next two topics in February!  Six people with strong opinions. It is a pretty amazing discussion.

Voices you often hear on the SPaMCAST include this cast of incredible minds:

Re-Read Saturday News

This week we take a break from our re-read of Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability: An Introduction by Daniel S. Vacanti. Remember to buy your copy today and read along, and we will be back next week! (more…)