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SPaMCAST 517 is very different from my original plan — and pretty cool if I do say so my self.  This week I spoke at ISMA 16 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. I was originally scheduled to open the session, however, the translators were two hours late. The Portuguese speaking speakers were moved earlier so that the conference could get started.  During my wait, I discovered that I could record sessions on my iPhone, therefore, the SPaMCAST 517 is a recording of my talk, titled Product Owners In Agile – The Really Hard Role! If you would like a copy of the slides please email me at SPaMCASTinfo@gmail.com .  

Note:  There is a bit of noise in the audio, shirt pockets might not be the best recording platforms.  


Re-Read Saturday News
Today we continue our journey through Bad Blood, Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou (published by Alfred A. Knopf, 2018).   Today we tackle chapters one and two. They are titled, “A Purposeful Life” and “Gluebot.”  I have not changed the estimate of 20 to 25 weeks, however, Stephen Adams has thrown down the gauntlet by suggesting we can do more than two chapters a week.  We shall see!

Links to the re-read!

Week 1 – Approach and Introductionhttps://bit.ly/2J1pY2t
Week 2 — A Purposeful Life and Gluebothttps://bit.ly/2RZANGh


Conferences and More!
ITMPI Webinar
Virtual
October 31
Register Now: https://bit.ly/2zo8MAV
Webinar:  Agile, Where Agile Fears to Tread

Next SPaMCAST
SPaMCAST 518 will feature our interview with Rebecca Staton-Reinstein.  We talk leadership and the difference between a leader and a manager. You need both!

ISMA 16 Banner

ISMA Banner!

We are enjoying a bit of a holiday.  Yesterday I toured La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. The basilica was started well over 100 years ago and is now planned to be completed in 2026.  I am struck by how persistent and motivating an idea can be.  While function points are not as old, they are equally as persistent and useful.  Please enjoy this throwback essay on function points: (more…)

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Test case points is only one approach to determining the size of work that needs to be tested. The other measures fall into three broad categories.  The categories are: (more…)

Sometimes estimation leaves you in a fog!

Sometimes estimation leaves you in a fog!

I recently asked a group of people the question, “What are the two largest issues in project estimation?” I received a wide range of answers; probably a reflection of the range of individuals answering.  Five macro categories emerged from the answers. They are:

  1. Requirements. The impact of unclear and changing requirements on budgeting and estimation was discussed in detail in the entry, Requirements: The Chronic Problem with Project Estimation.  Bottom line, change is required to embrace dynamic development methods and that change will require changes in how the organization evaluates projects.
  2. Estimate Reliability. The perceived lack of reliability of an estimate can be generated by many factors including differences in between development and estimation processes. One of the respondents noted, “most of the time the project does not believe the estimate and thus comes up with their own, which is primarily based on what they feel the customer wants to hear.”
  3. Project History. Both analogous and parametric estimation processes use the past as an input in determining the future.  Collection of consistent historical data is critical to learning and not repeating the same mistakes over and over.  According to Joe Schofield, “few groups retain enough relevant data from their experiences to avoid relearning the same lesson.”
  4. Labor Hours Are Not The Same As Size.  Many estimators either estimate the effort needed to perform the project or individual tasks.  By jumping immediately to effort, estimators miss all of the nuances that effect the level of effort required to deliver value.  According to Ian Brown, “then the discussion basically boils down to opinions of the number of hours, rather that assessing other attributes that drive the number of hours that something will take.”
  5. No One Dedicated to Estimation.  Estimating is a skill built on a wide range of techniques that need to be learned and practiced.  When no one is dedicated to developing and maintaining estimates it is rare that anyone can learn to estimate consistently, which affects reliability.  To quote one of the respondents, “consistency of estimation from team to team, and within a team over time, is non-existent.”

Each of the top five issues are solvable without throwing out the concept of estimation that are critical for planning at the organization, portfolio and product levels.  Every organization will have to wrestle with their own solution to the estimation conundrum. However the first step is to recognize the issues you face and your goals from the estimation process.

Listen to the Software Process and Measurement Cast (Here)

The Software Process and Measurement Cast features our interview with Charley Tichenor and Talmon Ben-Cnaan on the Software Non-Functional Assessment Process (SNAP).  SNAP is a standard process for measuring non-functional size.  Both Talmon and Charley are playing an instrumental role in developing and evolving the SNAP process and metric.  SNAP helps developers and leaders to shine a light on non-functional work required for software development and is useful for analyzing, planning and estimating work.

Talmon’s Bio:

Talmon Ben-Cnaan is the chairperson of the International Function Point User Group (IFPUG) committee for Non-Functional Software Sizing (NFSSC) and a Quality Manager at Amdocs. He led the Quality Measurements in his company, was responsible for collecting and analyzing measurements of software development projects and provided reports to senior management, based on those measurements. Talmon was also responsible for implementing Function Points in his organization.

Currently he manages quality operations and test methodology in Amdocs Testing division. The Amdocs Testing division includes more than 2,200 experts, located at more than 30 sites worldwide, and specializing in testing for the Telecommunication Service Providers.

Amdocs is the market leader in the Telecommunications market, with over 22,000 employees, delivering the most advanced business support systems (BSS), operational support systems (OSS), and service delivery to Communications Service Providers in more than 50 countries around the world.

Charley’s Bio:

Charley Tichenor has been a member of the International Function Point Users Group since 1991, and twice certified as a Certified Function Point Specialist.  He is currently a member of the IFPUG Non-functional Sizing Standards Committee, providing data collection and analysis support.  He recently retired from the US government with 32 years’ experience as an Operations Research Analyst, and is currently an Adjunct Professor with Marymount University in Washington, DC, teaching business analytics courses.  He has a BSBA degree from The Ohio State University, an MBA from Virginia Tech, and a Ph.D. in Business from Berne University.

 

Note:  Charley begins the interview with a work required disclaimer but then we SNAP to it … so to speak.

Next

In the next Software Process and Measurement Cast we will feature our essay on product owners.  The role of the product owner is one of the hardest to implement when embracing Agile. However how the role of the product owner is implemented is often a clear determinant of success with Agile.  The ideas in our essay can help you get it right.

We will also have new columns from the Software Sensei, Kim Pries and Jo Ann Sweeney with her Explaining Communication series.

Call to action!

We are in the middle of a re-read of John Kotter’s classic Leading Change on the Software Process and Measurement Blog.  Are you participating in the re-read? Please feel free to jump in and add your thoughts and comments!

After we finish the current re-read will need to decide which book will be next.  We are building a list of the books that have had the most influence on readers of the blog and listeners to the podcast.  Can you answer the question?

What are the two books that have most influenced you career (business, technical or philosophical)?  Send the titles to spamcastinfo@gmail.com.

First, we will compile a list and publish it on the blog.  Second, we will use the list to drive future  “Re-read” Saturdays. Re-read Saturday is an exciting new feature that began on the Software Process and Measurement blog on November 8th.  Feel free to choose you platform; send an email, leave a message on the blog, Facebook or just tweet the list (use hashtag #SPaMCAST)!

Shameless Ad for my book!

Mastering Software Project Management: Best Practices, Tools and Techniques co-authored by Murali Chematuri and myself and published by J. Ross Publishing. We have received unsolicited reviews like the following: “This book will prove that software projects should not be a tedious process, neither for you or your team.” Support SPaMCAST by buying the book here.

Available in English and Chinese.

 

Listen to SPaMCAST 297 now!

SPaMCAST 297 features our essay on IPFUG Function Points. IFPUG Function Points are a measure of the functionality delivered by the project or application being counted based on a set of rules documented in the IFPUG Counting Practices Manual (CPM). The measure of delivered functionality is a proxy for size which can be used in estimating and measuring work. An analogy for function points is the measure of the number of square feet (or square meters) of a house. Want more?  Listen to SPaMCAST 297 now!

Next week we will feature our interview with Brian Federici.  We discussed working in an environment with a nearly continuous delivery model from the point of view of a practitioner. Does what sounds good in theory really work when it is implemented?

Upcoming Events (more…)

 

Sometimes estimation leaves you in a fog!

Sometimes estimation leaves you in a fog!

When I recently asked a group of people the question “What are the two largest issues in project estimation?”, I received a wide range of answers. The range of answers is probably a reflection of the range of individuals answering.  Five macro categories emerged from the answers. They are:

  1. Requirements. The impact of unclear and changing requirements on budgeting and estimation was discussed in detail in the entry, Requirements: The Chronic Problem with Project Estimation.  Bottom line, change is required to embrace dynamic development methods and that change will require changes in how the organization evaluates projects.
  2. Estimate Reliability. The perceived lack of reliability of an estimate can be generated by many factors including differences in between development and estimation processes. One of the respondents noted, “most of the time the project does not believe the estimate and thus comes up with their own, which is primarily based on what they feel the customer wants to hear.”
  3. Project History. Both analogous and parametric estimation processes use the past as an input in determining the future.  Collection of consistent historical data is critical to learning and not repeating the same mistakes over and over.  According to Joe Schofield, “few groups retain enough relevant data from their experiences to avoid relearning the same lesson.”
  4. Labor Hours Are Not The Same As Size.  Many estimators either estimate the effort needed to perform the project or individual tasks.  By jumping immediately to effort, estimators miss all of the nuances that effect the level of effort required to deliver value.  According to Ian Brown, “then the discussion basically boils down to opinions of the number of hours, rather that assessing other attributes that drive the number of hours that something will take.”
  5. No One Dedicated to Estimation.  Estimating is a skill built on a wide range of techniques that need to be learned and practiced.  When no one is dedicated to developing and maintaining estimates it is rare that anyone can learn to estimate consistently, which affects reliability.  To quote one of the respondents, “consistency of estimation from team to team, and within a team over time, is non-existent.”

 

Each of the top five issues are solvable without throwing out the concept of estimation that are critical for planning at the organization, portfolio and product levels.  Every organization will have to wrestle with their own solution to the estimation conundrum. However the first step is to recognize the issues you face and your goals from the estimation process.