Check Mark

Check!

Understanding customer satisfaction is important. It might be more important for a product or services sold to someone outside the firm because of the link between satisfaction and sales —  no customers = no revenue. Understanding customer satisfaction for internal IT groups, groups that support the value chain, are often given short shrift. However, careers and budgets are influenced by satisfaction. Making sure you have the right approach and logistics for measuring internal customer satisfaction is critical for being successful. The questions described in earlier blog entries in this theme (see below) can be used as a really simple checklist. Review the questions below and answer them with either: yes, no, or no clue.  (more…)

Soap, Shampoo, Towel and Rubber Duckie

Everything you need for a proper bath!

The fourth category of considerations for an organization that is primarily focused on internal applications to think about before they start measuring customer satisfaction is self-sufficiency. However, before we start, after the first article in this theme, I was asked whether the overhead of the four considerations would put teams and individuals off from talking to their clients, customers, and stakeholders. The simple answer is no. Conversations with individuals about their satisfaction with your efforts are important feedback tools. Sprint Reviews and Demos are events that are structured to create those conversations.  Conversations and formally measuring customer satisfaction are not the same thing. Neither should preclude or interfere with the other but rather doing both will provide different types of information. If you are not talking with your stakeholders, I will put it more succinctly: you probably have a career issue that measurement will not fix.   (more…)

 

Rock piled by the shoreMost internal IT organizations do not have a lot of experience as professional customer research personnel, but they have to get a handle on how their work is perceived. Before tackling the collection and analysis of how customers and clients perceive their work there are four considerations, we take a deeper dive into three today. (more…)

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SPaMCAST 544 features our interview with Jeppe Hedaa.  Mr. Hedaa and I discuss his new book, Nucleon: The Missing Formula That Measures Your IT Development Team’s Performance. Our discussion centers on the book but also touches on meritocracy and why you want top performers on a team. This is a wide-ranging interview with thought-provoking ideas as we talk about Nucleon!

Jeppe’s bio:

Jeppe Hedaa has been working with complex systems development for more than 30 years, serving the largest IT development departments. He is the CEO and owner of 7N, who is an agent for top 3% IT specialists. 7N has departments in the US, Switzerland, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Poland, India and Denmark. In September 2018 he published the book “Nucleon: The missing formula that measures your IT department’s performance”, where he describes how to calculate a hard number for an IT team’s performance that could best be compared to that of horsepower in a car. In the book, he also measures the factors that hold back an organization’s delivery and identifies the most impactful areas for improvement.

Our review of Nucleon: http://bit.ly/2XQvB9T (more…)

Nucleon by Jeppe Hedaa is a short and concise book that is rich in thought-provoking ideas. To give you a sense of scope, the subtitle, “The Missing Formula That Measures Your IT Development Team’s Performance” speaks volumes. The book weighs in at 119 pages with front matter (always read the front matter), six chapters and eight pages of endnotes. I will admit that I am a sucker for grand unifying theories. I am still rooting for Stephen Hawking to posthumously pull a rabbit out of the hat (I sure hope someone is looking through Hawking’s personal papers). Mr. Hedaa, founder and CEO of 7N, developed the theory that team effectivity is a function of the sum of each person’s effectivity (the ability to be effective). Effectivity is a function of people, organizational, and complexity factors. Arguably the idea that people, organizational, and complexity factors influence effectivity is not controversial.  But, these factors can be consistently measured and then used in a deterministic manner to predict performance is controversial. Mr. Hedaa spends the six chapters of the book developing a logical argument based on experience and data for the premise that there are ways to measure the factors that matter and that knowing the answer matters to leaders that want to get the maximum value from the money they spend on software development (the broad definition that includes development, enhancement, and maintenance). The Nucleon formula is: (more…)

On a scale of fist to five, I’m at a ten.

(This is lightly re-edited version of a post from 2016 — I have been on planes for two days going hither and yon, therefore, we are revisiting quality.)

Quality is partly about the number of defects delivered in a piece of software and partly about how the stakeholders and customers experience the software.  Experience is typically measured as customer satisfaction. Customer satisfaction is a measure of how products and services supplied by a company meet or surpass customer expectations. Customer satisfaction is impacted by all three aspects of software quality: functional (what the software does), structural (whether the software meets standards) and process (how the code was built). (more…)

The kingfisher was about this far away!

Each mapping layer, value chains, value streams, and process maps serve related but different purposes. As an organization drills down from a value chain to a process map different measures and metrics are exposed. One could summarize value chain metrics as high-level cost, revenue and speed while process mapping as variations on effort, delay, and work-in-process. Each metric set is highly related but targeted at different levels of the organization.

Value Chain Metrics Pallet (more…)