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The Software Process and Measurement Cast 395 features our essay on productivity.  While productivity might not be the coolest subject, understanding the concept is critical to every company’s and every worker’s financial well-being.

Gene Hughson brings another entry from his Form Follows Function blog to the Software Process and Measurement Cast. Gene discusses the idea of accidental innovation.  Gene suggests that innovation is not a happy accident, but is a result of a process, structure, and technology that can enhance innovation. However, it can just as easily get in the way.

In our third column this week, Kim Pries, the Software Sensei, brings us a discussion of how software developers leverage assimilation and accommodation in the acquisition of knowledge.

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The more complex the door, the lower the 'door' productivity.

The more complex the door, the lower the ‘door’ productivity – but not always.

While productivity is a simple calculation, there are a few mistakes organizations tend to make.  The five most common mistakes reduce the usefulness of measuring productivity, or worse can cause organizations to make poor decisions based on bad numbers.  The five most common usage and calculation mistakes are: (more…)

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In simplest terms, productivity is the ratio of output per unit of input.

Almost every conversation about change includes a promise of greater productivity.  In simplest terms, productivity is the ratio of output per unit of input.  While the equation is for calculating productivity is straightforward, as we have discussed, deciding on which outputs from an organization or process to count is never straightforward. The decisions on the input side of the equation are often equally contentious.  Three critical decisions shape what measures will be needed to supply the inputs used to calculate productivity.   (more…)

 How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition

How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition

Next week we will begin the read of Commitment – Novel About Managing Project Risk by Olav Maassen and Chris Matts.  I am currently trying to determine the approach to the blog entries for this book.  I believe this will be a relatively quick read or re-read based on the pace and style of the book.  This is mostly a graphic novel (one of my favorite styles), which might put some off of the book.  Buy your copy today and start reading. If you use the link above it will support the podcast.  I am running the poll for the next book after Commitment to save time when we are ready for the next, next book in a few weeks!  As in past polls please vote twice or suggest a write-in candidate in the comments.  We will run the poll for one more week.

Final Notes of HTMA (more…)

HTMA

How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition

Chapter 14 of How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition is the last chapter in the book.  Next week I will spend a few moments reflecting on the value I have gotten from this re-read; HOWEVER, the last chapter continues to deliver content, so let’s not get ahead of ourselves.  This chapter shows us:

  • A process for applying Applied Information Economics (which I used recently), and that
  • AIE is applicable in nearly every scenario.

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 How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition

How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition

Chapter 13 of How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition is the second chapter in the final section of the book.  Hubbard titled Chapter 13:  New Measurement Instruments for Management.  Hubbard shifts gears in this chapter to focus the reader on the new tools that our dynamic, electronically-tethered environment has created.  Here is a summary of the chapter in a few bullet points:

  • Everyone creates data that is trackable and measurable.
  • The internet is a measurement instrument
  • Prediction markets are a way to synthesize  

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HTMA

How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition


Chapter 12 of How to Measure Anything, Finding the Value of “Intangibles in Business” Third Edition is the second chapter in the final section of the book.  Hubbard titled Chapter 12 The Ultimate Measurement Instrument: Human Judges.  The majority of HTMA has focused on different statistical tools and techniques.  This chapter examines the human as a measurement tool.  Here is a summary of the chapter in a few bullet points:

  • Expert judgement is often impacted by cognitive biases.
  • Improve unaided expert judgment by using simple (sic) statistical techniques.
  • Above all else, don’t use a method that adds more error to the initial estimate.

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