Book cover: Tame your Work Flow

Tame your Work Flow

Self-knowledge is valuable to keep yourself reigned in, I really think Little’s Law is important. This week I needed to make sure I did not go overboard in discussing the ramifications of the theorem (I will include links at the end of this week’s re-read for those who want to go into depth). Chapter 3 of Tame your Work Flow is incredibly important for understanding the overall book. In your re-read spend the time needed understanding how the themes noted in the chapter title Flow Efficiency, Little’s Law and Economic Impact inter-relate. (more…)

Book cover: Tame your Work Flow

Tame your Work Flow

Re-read Saturday, Tame you Work Flow Week 3:  Chapter 2—Postpone Commitment and Limit Work in Process

Today we tackle Chapter 2 in our re-read of Tame your Work Flow by Steve Tendon and Daniel Doiron. The chapter is titled Postpone Commitment and Limit Work in Process. Last we mentioned multitasking, this week we make a full assault on the topic. (more…)

Book cover: Tame your Work Flow

Tame your Work Flow

Today we tackle Chapter 1 in our re-read of Tame your Work Flow by Steve Tendon and Daniel Doiron. Chapter 1 lays out the four flows which the book explores in detail and begins a deep dive into the power of mental models. The Chapter also touches on one of the great evils of modern times — multitasking (I say that with no attempt at hyperbole).   (more…)

Book cover: Tame your Work Flow

Tame your Work Flow

Today we begin in our re-read of Tame your Work Flow by Steve Tendon and Daniel Doiron in earnest with the Prologue.  The prologue introduces concepts and provides a bridge for readers to this book from the Goal by Eli Goldratt and Steve Tendon, and Wolfram Müller’s book Hyper-Productive Knowledge Work Performance, The TameFlow Approach and Its Application to Scrum and Kanban (more…)

Book cover: Tame your Work Flow

Tame your Work Flow

This week we begin our journey through Tame your Work Flow by Steve Tendon and Daniel Doiron. The book is subtitled: How Dr. Goldratt of “The Goal” would apply the Theory of Constraints to rethink knowledge-work management. The title and subtitle provide a hint to the number of ideas and concepts that we will touch on as we re-read the 357 pages that include a section about the organization of the book, an introduction, a prologue, 21 chapters, and an epilogue. The chapters and epilogue are arranged in seven parts. The term girthy jumps to mind, however as Daniel Vacanti points out in his portion of the forward, the visualizations ensure understanding. A few more admissions and logistics before we get started: (more…)

Book Cover

This is our last installment of our re-read of Crucial Conversations: Tools For Talking When Stakes Are High, Second Edition. I want to thank Nancy Kastl for the great suggestion and everyone that voted during the selection process. This is a useful book. Interestingly during a Heart of Agile get together this week a number of people recommended the book in the chat. I am glad I read it. Reading the book for the first time during the re-read process did add a bit of additional effort. I found that I had to skim the material more than I would have liked and probably missed some of the nuances.  (more…)

Book Cover

We are completing the content of our Re-read of Crucial Conversations today by reviewing Chapter 11 and the Afterword.  

Chapter 11 is a summarization of the entire book.  The authors use two tools in this chapter. The first is a table to help the readers remember all of the techniques and the process laid out in the first 10 chapters.  The table begins on page 214 with principle one “Start With Your Heart” and ending on page 216 with principle seven “Moved To Action.” If this were a workbook, I would have expected this table to be on a removable page for use during crucial conversations.  I made myself a cheat sheet that I keep just out of camera sight for use in remote meetings. (more…)

Book Cover

The subtitle for this chapter of Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High, Second Edition by Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, Switzler is ‘Advice for tough cases.’ Rather than enumerating the different tough cases (and the authors run through a bunch), I want to point out that this is a chapter I think I will return to in the future.  In my considered opinion nothing ever goes perfectly to plan. All conversations are a mixture of things that you’ve run through your head to prepare and parts that are off-script. Having a wide range of additional tactics for hard issues makes it easier to approach crucial conversations with confidence. (more…)

In celebration of blowing past my 100-mile running goal this month (I ran and hiked 200+ miles) taking the day off and organizing my desk. A quick reminder, we are in the middle of polling to determine the next book in the Re-Read Saturday Feature.  The four books we are trying to narrow down are:

  • Tame Your Workflow (Tendon and Doiron)
  • Great Big Agile (Dalton) 
  • Fixing Your Scrum (Ripley and Miller)
  • The Lean Startup (Ries)

Of the four, I have interviewed the authors of three of the books recently. If you need a bit more information before voting use the links at the end of this post to listen to the podcasts and then vote.  Otherwise, vote now!

The poll will be open until May 8th.  You may vote once a day if you really want to put your thumb on the scale.   (more…)

Book Cover

 

This week we tackle Chapter 9 of Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High, Second Edition by Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, Switzler. titled Move To Action. The subtitle is a fair summary of the ideas in the chapter: how to turn crucial conversations into action and results.   (more…)