This week the fallout from overpromising the on the ability to deliver the miniLab spreads to Safeway in our re-read of Bad Blood, Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup.  Overpromising is a problem every team and organization faces. Almost all humans want to say yes and make people happy. As trained problem solvers, we rarely meet problems that we can not overcome, and hence we are optimistic in what we promise.  The shenanigans at Theranos might not have the same root cause. Buy the book and read along!   (more…)

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This week we conclude our re-read of The Checklist Manifesto with a few final thoughts and notes and a restatement of a checklist for a checklist that Stephen Adams contributed in the comments for Chapter 9 – they deserve more exposure.  A few of the key takeaways are: (more…)

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This week we tackle Chapter 9 of The Checklist Manifesto .  The Save is the final chapter in the book.  Next week we will discuss our final thoughts and decide on the next book.  In chapter 9 Atul Gawande expresses his experiences with the surgical checklist he helped to create.  A combination of emotion and evidence.

The Save is the shortest chapter in The Checklist Manifesto weighing in at only 5 pages.  Perhaps I should have considered the chapter when we talked about The Fix (chapter 8) but I even though the chapter is short the message is important.  The two major points in this chapter are:

  1. Don’t be a hypocrite.  Change agents must eat their own dog food. In this instance, Gawande talked about how he used the checklist in his own practice.  When you are helping to shape change, using your own advice provides a number of benefits. Those benefits include generating feedback based on first-hand observation and taking and holding the moral high ground.
  2. Checklists are effective at improving outcomes.  In the chapter, the author references several examples, including one that saved a patients life, of how checklists are effective to help improve outcomes and generate the conversations between team members.

Given the title of the book, wrapping the up the book with a statement about the effectiveness of checklists is not a shock.  The example of a patient that nearly died that is the backbone of the chapter is important as a final statement because it reiterates that we have to think and talk about what we are doing even if we have performed the action a hundred times before.  Gawande’s message is not dissimilar to the message that L. David Marquet delivered when he described deliberate actions. Our actions regardless of the outcome will have an impact on the world around us, therefore, try to make the impact as positive as possible. Our review of chapter 8 (last week) ended with the admonition “try a checklist,”  After chapter 9 I would add, “because our actions matter.”

We need your input to choose the next book.  I will cut off the poll on October 3rd. Make sure your voice is heard!

Remember to buy a copy of The Checklist Manifesto and READ along!

Previous Installments:

Week 9 – The Hero In The Age of Checklistshttps://bit.ly/2PWu2TC

Week 8 – The Fix – https://bit.ly/2NeKyBE

Week 7 – The Checklist Factoryhttps://bit.ly/2wV3yu3

Week 6 – The First Tryhttps://bit.ly/2Q0PhVt

Week 5 – The Ideahttps://bit.ly/2PCs0Zz

Week 4 – The End Of The Master Builderhttps://bit.ly/2BmIGBc

Week 3 – The Checklisthttps://bit.ly/2KMhVFR

Week 2 – The Problem With Extreme Complexityhttps://bit.ly/2AGZQZX

Week 1 – Approach and Introductionhttps://bit.ly/2LYi9Lv

 

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We have four or five more weeks left in this re-read, which means it is time to start soliciting ideas for the next book. Sandeep Koorse has suggested Charles Duhigg’s The Power of Habit  (actually he referenced the book twice in his appearance on the SPaMCAST 511 which will be coming out tomorrow). What are your suggestions?

In week 7 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we read about Atul’s visit to the Checklist Factory. In this chapter, Dr. Gawande provides the reader with many of the basics needed to create valuable checklists.

 

Chapter 6, The Checklist Factory (more…)

In week 6 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we read about Atul’s first try using a checklist to solve a big problem.  The Chapter is titled The First Try. Let’s just say it is a learning opportunity.

The chapter starts with an example of Dr. Gawande engaging with the World Health Organization (WHO) to help address safety because of the massive increase in the number of surgeries. The problem was not that surgeries were being done, surgery saves lives, but rather the number of complications that happened in conjunction with the surgeries. The rate of post-surgical complications was unacceptably high. (more…)

checklist-manifesto Book

In week 5 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we tackle Chapter 4, The Idea. In Chapter 4 Gawande shows us how checklists can help push decision-making outward, which empowers teams and makes them more responsive.

For simple routine problems, forcing functions have great appeal.  I put my company badge and car keys in the same place, everyday – check. I put my lunch box in the freezer — check. I am home — check. A simple routine checklist that makes going to work in the morning less complicated. The checklist for routine problems can be spelled out in great detail to precipitate behaviors. That said, not everything we face in day-to-day or business environments is routine. (more…)

In week 4 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we tackle Chapter 3, The End Of The Master Builder.  In Chapter 3 Gawande identifies the scenarios in which checklists have an impact. Checklists provide value even in complicated scenarios. (more…)