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We have four or five more weeks left in this re-read, which means it is time to start soliciting ideas for the next book. Sandeep Koorse has suggested Charles Duhigg’s The Power of Habit  (actually he referenced the book twice in his appearance on the SPaMCAST 511 which will be coming out tomorrow). What are your suggestions?

In week 7 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we read about Atul’s visit to the Checklist Factory. In this chapter, Dr. Gawande provides the reader with many of the basics needed to create valuable checklists.

 

Chapter 6, The Checklist Factory (more…)

In week 6 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we read about Atul’s first try using a checklist to solve a big problem.  The Chapter is titled The First Try. Let’s just say it is a learning opportunity.

The chapter starts with an example of Dr. Gawande engaging with the World Health Organization (WHO) to help address safety because of the massive increase in the number of surgeries. The problem was not that surgeries were being done, surgery saves lives, but rather the number of complications that happened in conjunction with the surgeries. The rate of post-surgical complications was unacceptably high. (more…)

checklist-manifesto Book

In week 5 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we tackle Chapter 4, The Idea. In Chapter 4 Gawande shows us how checklists can help push decision-making outward, which empowers teams and makes them more responsive.

For simple routine problems, forcing functions have great appeal.  I put my company badge and car keys in the same place, everyday – check. I put my lunch box in the freezer — check. I am home — check. A simple routine checklist that makes going to work in the morning less complicated. The checklist for routine problems can be spelled out in great detail to precipitate behaviors. That said, not everything we face in day-to-day or business environments is routine. (more…)

In week 4 of re-read of The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) we tackle Chapter 3, The End Of The Master Builder.  In Chapter 3 Gawande identifies the scenarios in which checklists have an impact. Checklists provide value even in complicated scenarios. (more…)

Today we begin the read of the The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along). The version of the book we are reading is published by Metropolitan Book, 2009 and is the 22nd printing. The book has nine chapters and with acknowledgments has 209 pages. My reading plan is one chapter per week, therefore, the re-read will span 11 weeks (including today).  

Introduction

Until relatively recently I did not read forewords and introductions. I think I have missed a lot of contexts. The Checklist Manifesto starts with two stories from the medical arena. In the first story, the doctor missed a piece of knowledge that nearly killed the patient. If the attending physician had asked about the type of weapon that caused the wound the patient would have had less of an issue. In the second story, the surgical team missed a slight (but important) treatment deviation that stopped the patient’s heart. The patient only survived because the team stumbled over the deviation in the norm.

Prior to writing The Checklist Manifesto the paper, Toward a Theory of Medical Fallibility (note the paper, although thought provoking is difficult to get. I found a source to read online but a copy is $18 USD) made a major impact on Gawande’s thought process. The paper lays out a framework to understand why mistakes are made. There are two overall categories of mistakes. The first is due to havingonly partial understanding. For example, trying to generate cold fusion and failing, falls into this category because no one knows how to generate cold fusion, we have a partial understanding. The second category is ineptitude. Ineptitude describes incidences that in which knowledge exists but is not applied correctly. Checklists, and therefore the book, are a tool to attack the second type of incident. The idea, that some mistakes or errors are controllable and some are not might not sound earth-shattering. Not adopting a way to deal with those that are controllable is disconcerting.  

The introduction was worth the price of admission! Why didn’t I read introductions and forewords in the past . . . silly me.

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Turn the Ship Around

We will complete our re-read of Turn The Ship Around next week with a few final thoughts.  The next book in the series will be The Checklist Manifesto  (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) by  Atul Gawande. Today we complete re-reading the chapters in  L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around!  Chapter 28, 29 and Afterthoughts complete Marquet’s reflection on the leader-leader model and his journey of discovery.

Chapter 28: A New Method of Resupplying

The setup question for this chapter is, “Do you want to empower employees but find that empowerment programs don’t help?”

The story Marquet uses to drive the ideas in the chapter home centers around the Santa Fe’s need for oil to be resupplied due to a leak. If the Sante Fe is not resupplied the boat will not be able to keep its perfect record of meeting all mission goals.  The supply ship Rainier is also transiting the Straits of Hormuz (another one of those busy scary places). Using the normal channels getting supplies from the Rainier would have taken too long. Personnel on both vessels found a way to get the Santa Fe the oil, trade mail and also some fresh fruit.   (more…)

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Turn the Ship Around

 

I forecast, barring any huge incidents, that we will complete our re-read of Turn The Ship Around on 22 July, 2018.  The next book in the series will be The Checklist Manifesto  (use the link and buy a copy so you can read along) by  Atul Gawande. Today we tackle two more chapters in L. David Marquet’s Turn the Ship Around!  

 

Chapter 26: Combat Effectiveness

The question that opens this chapter is “Are you looking for resilience in your organization?” (more…)