Re-read Saturday


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The availability heuristic, introduced in Chapter 12,  states that we make judgments about an attribute based on how easy or hard it is to retrieve information about the attribute. In Chapter 13, Kahneman dives deeper into how the ability heuristic functions and provides some hints on how it can be used. (more…)

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Today we dive into the availability heuristic.  The availability heuristic is useful for understanding what people believe and how they will act.  A twist in using the availability heuristic is useful for disrupting beliefs based on impressions or events that can be quickly remembered. All leaders need to understand the impact of top of mind experiences on decision making and how to disrupt those biases, the availability heuristic is a tool for building that knowledge.  (more…)

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Today we dive into the concept of Anchors and the impact of anchor bias. This is one of my favorite topics for understanding behaviors in negotiations. Negotiations are all around us whether you are discussing salary, buying a car, or wrestling with a request for an impossible due date.  All this and more in Chapter 11 of our re-read of Thinking, Fast and Slow, so to quote Jackie Gleason, “Away we go!” (more…)

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I had planned to cover two chapters this week of Thinking, Fast and Slow.  I completed the reading and notes on Friday this week at 3:30 AM while waiting to go to the airport.  As in the past, when I began sorting out my thinking about the content nearly 600 words where on the paper.  This is the power of this book, it is incredibly rich in useful ideas. While it might be a priming effect (Chapter 11), I used the law of small numbers to explain why it wasn’t a good idea to jump to conclusions based outcome of a survey of a few teams. I repeat, even though I re-reading the book (actually my wife’s copy of the book) I am finding new ideas and hope you are also!  Onwards!  

Part Two: Heuristics and Biases

Chapter 10 – Law of Small Numbers

As I read this chapter, I was struck by the relationship between two very different approaches to thinking. One of the relationships occurs because System 2 relies on Systems 1’s associative machine (system 1 connects the dots between ideas). System 1 creates associations that are useful to System 2 (remember that System 2 is lazy).  Both systems can and do work together.  (more…)

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Today, two stories… wrong column…today we take on two chapters in our re-read of Thinking, Fast and Slow, chapters 8 and 9: How Judgment Happens and Answering An Easier Question. I would be interested in your feedback on the depth in this entry compared to previous entries. (more…)

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This week we re-read Chapter 7 of Thinking, Fast and Slow,  A Machine for Jumping to Conclusions.  Logistics note: every time I think I can get to a two chapters a week cadence with this book, I find that hit a chapter that I really think is full of ideas that will be useful for thinking about how people behave and how change can be facilitated and feel that I need to spend more time with it. Maybe next week!   (more…)

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Chapter 6, Norms, Surprises, and Causes, continues the deep dive into System 1 thinking. As noted before, System 1 thinking continually is active nearly all of the time making snap decisions based on associated that it has constructed. In Chapter 6 Kahneman asserts that the main role of system one “is to maintain and update a model of your personal world, which represents what is normal in it.” The Associative Machine (Chapter 5) defines one mechanism the brain uses to construct a model of the world around us.   (more…)

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