Scrum


Control!

The product owner (PO) role is incredibly important in any Agile effort. The product owner leads, manages and prioritizes the backlog and networks with stakeholders, customers, and developers of all stripes.  All sorts of problems can beset the role. However, most of those problems are either self-inflicted or a result of poor organizational design.  A laundry list of problems based on observation and responses from other product owners include:

  1. Product Owners Are From IT
  2. Product Owners Are Not Part of The Team
  3. Having a Project versus Product Orientation
  4. Overly Broad and/or Ill-Defined Product Owner Role
  5. Using Proxy Product Owners
  6. Adopting Technical and Business Product Owners
  7. Allowing Part-time Product Owners
  8. Failure of Product Owner to Lead
  9. Product Owner with Controlling Personality

The next set of difficulties are: (more…)

Ill-defined Roles Block The Elevator!

As I considered the intricacies and difficulties of the Product Owner role, I was concerned that my perceptions might not be as inclusive as possible. In order to expand my understanding of the role and to test my experiences, I asked over fifty product owners why they thought the role was hard.  The majority responded and I have scattered excerpts from their responses throughout the essay.  Based on observation and responses the most common reasons the role is difficult are:

  1. Product Owners Are From IT
  2. Product Owners Are Not Part of The Team
  3. Having a Project versus Product Orientation
  4. Overly Broad and/or Ill-Defined Product Owner Role
  5. Using Proxy Product Owners
  6. Adopting Technical and Business Product Owners
  7. Allowing Part-time Product Owners
  8. Failure of Product Owner to Lead
  9. Product Owner with Controlling Personality

The product owner role is difficult, and perhaps consistently more difficult than any other role in software delivery.  Part of the difficulty is a reflection of information asymmetries, other difficulties arise because of how we use words or who is assigned to be product owners.  The next two of most common reasons the product owner role is difficult are: (more…)

Doing the Product Owner Role Poorly is Like Drowning!

The product owner role is evolving in most organizations. The role has its roots in the roles of product managers, project managers, business subject matter experts (SME) and project sponsors from other methods.  The roles and the responsibilities of the role are critical in any Agile approach to delivering value. The product owner role is difficult, and perhaps consistently more difficult than any other role in software delivery.  The reasons the role is difficult can be traced to several solvable scenarios. The most common reasons are: (more…)

13655612593_1229e2c6f4_h

Organizational culture is a reflection of the beliefs, ideologies, policies, and practices of an organization. Culture is important because it guides what and how work gets done. Team culture, in Agile, in addition to being influenced by the organization’s culture is heavily influenced by the product owner’s interpretation of the organization’s culture.
(more…)

Heads up!

Heads up!

A Scum of Scrums (SoS) is a mechanism to coordinate a group of teams so that they act as a team of teams.  SoS is a powerful tool. As with any powerful tool, if you use it wrong, problems will ensue. Six problematic implementations, called anti-patterns, are fairly common. We’ll discuss three in part 1 and finish the rest in part 2. (more…)

Preparing for a Daily Stand Up

Preparing for a Daily Stand Up

The daily stand-up meeting is the easiest Agile practice to adopt and the easiest to get wrong.  In order to get it right, we need to understand the basic process and the most common variants. These include interacting with task lists/boards and distributed team members. The basic process is blindingly simple.

  • The team gathers on a daily basis.
  • Each team member answers three basic questions:
    • What tasks did I complete since the last meeting;
    • What tasks do I intend to complete before the next meeting, and
    • What are the issues blocking my progress.
  • The meeting ends, team members return to work OR discuss other items.

(more…)

Listen Now

Subscribe on iTunes

I am on vacation for two weeks and could not leave you without some Monday morning mind candy, therefore, we are doing two very special shows this week and next.  This week I have included the responses to the “if you could fix any two (or sometimes just one) things” question I ask at the end every interview from the three most downloaded interviews of 2013.  The top three and one extra were::

SPaMCAST 224 featured Mike Burrows. Mike focused his wishes on:

  1. Changes agents need to take their role as change agents seriously.
  2. Delay is expensive.

Link: http://spamcast.libsyn.com/s-pa-mcast-224-mike-burrows-kanban-values

SPaMCAST 246 featured Tobias Mayer. Tobias focused his wish on:

  1. People, not management or consultants, need to own scrum. (One wish was enough for Tobias)

Link: http://spamcast.libsyn.com/s-pa-mcast-246-tobias-mayer-t-he-people-s-scrum

SPaMCAST 270 featured Alan Shalloway.  Alan focused his two wishes on:

  1. Everyone needs to acknowledge there are laws of software development.
  2. Assuming that everyone involved in delivering software is highly motivated.

Link: http://spamcast.libsyn.com/s-pa-mcast-270-alan-shalloway-sa-fe-lean-kanban

And just because I could . . . a bit of lagniappe, SPaMCAST 138 Featured Jo Ann Sweeney. Jo Ann focused her wishes on:

  1. Reminding the listeners that change often starts before IT starts a project there we need to listen carefully to the stakeholders.
  2. Project teams should care about end users.

Link: http://spamcast.libsyn.com/s-pa-mcast-138-jo-ann-sweeney-communication

If these excerpts tickled your fancy listen to the whole interview by clicking on the links shown above.

Next week the best excerpts from 2014!

Next Page »